Tag Archives: US Government News

U.S. raises tariffs on European aircraft in ongoing dispute over subsidies

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government on Friday said it would increase tariffs on aircraft imported from the European Union to 15% from 10%, ratcheting up pressure on Brussels in a nearly 16-year transatlantic dispute over aircraft subsidies.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Airbus is pictured at the aircraft builder’s headquarters of Airbus in Colomiers near Toulouse, France, November 15, 2019. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau/File Photo

The U.S. Trade Representative’s Office said it remained open to reaching a negotiated settlement with the EU on the issue, but could revise its actions if the EU imposed tariffs of its own in connection with a pair of disputes over the subsidies.

In a statement released late on Friday, USTR said it would make minor modifications to 25% tariffs imposed on cheese, wine and other non-aircraft products from the EU, including dropping prune juice from the list. It did not raise the tariff rates on those product, as it had suggested it might do in October.

The higher aircraft tariff will take effect March 18.

The U.S. action comes as U.S. President Donald Trump, emboldened by agreement on a Phase 1 trade deal with China, has trained his sights on restructuring the more than $1 trillion U.S.-EU trade relationship, raising the specter of another major trade war as the global economy slows.

EU officials have said they want to negotiate with Washington but will not be bullied into submission.

European planemaker Airbus (AIR.PA) said the U.S. move would hit U.S. airlines already facing a shortage of aircraft and complicate efforts to reach a negotiated settlement with the European Union in the longstanding dispute.

Airbus said it would continue discussions with U.S. customers to “mitigate effects of tariffs insofar as possible” and hoped USTR would change its position, particularly given the threat of EU tariffs on U.S. products in its own case before the World Trade Organization.

“USTR’s decision ignores the many submissions made by U.S. airlines, highlighting the fact that they – and the U.S. flying public – ultimately have to pay these tariffs,” the company said in a statement.

EU officials had no immediate comment on Friday’s news.

The USTR had announced in December that it could increase tariff rates up to 100% and subject additional EU products to tariffs, following a decision by the WTO that EU launch aid to Airbus continued to harm the U.S. aerospace industry.

The WTO in October had awarded Washington the right to impose tariffs on $7.5 billion of annual EU imports in its case against Airbus. Washington then slapped 10% tariffs on most European-made Airbus jets and 25% duties on products ranging from cheese to olives and single-malt whisky, from Oct. 18.

Boeing, in a statement, said it was working with U.S. federal and state officials to “promptly bring the United States into full compliance” with WTO rulings.

“The EU and Airbus could end these tariffs by finally complying with their legal obligations, ending these illegal subsidies, and addressing their ongoing harm. We hope they will,” the company said in a statement.

The Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America (WSWA) said it remains strongly opposed to tariffs on European-origin wine and spirits, and urged U.S. and EU trade officials to negotiate an end to a trade dispute that was lowering revenues.

A study commissioned by the group estimated that the 25% tariffs implemented in October could result in the loss of nearly 36,000 jobs in the beverage alcohol industry.

The Distilled Spirits Council of the United States said tit-for-tat tariffs on alcoholic beverages were hurting companies and consumers on both sides of the Atlantic.

It said new U.S. government data showed the U.S. spirit industry’s exports to the EU, its largest export market, fell 27% in 2019 from a year earlier, and global exports of American whiskey declined 16% in the same period.

“We urge both sides to resolve these disputes so that consumers can enjoy #ToastsNotTariffs,” the group said.

Reporting by Andrea Shalal and Makini Brice; Editing by Daniel Wallis

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Trump Fed nominee Shelton hits bipartisan skepticism in Senate hearing

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Federal Reserve board nominee Judy Shelton faced deep skepticism from Republicans and Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday, as lawmakers challenged her independence from President Donald Trump and characterized her thinking as too far outside the mainstream to trust with the nation’s economy.

After the hearing, three Republican senators indicated she had not fully alleviated their concerns – enough to sink her nomination in a committee divided between 13 of Trump’s fellow Republicans and 12 Democrats, who are unlikely to vote in her favor.

Over the course of the roughly two-hour hearing she found herself having to back away from prior views, explain that she would not pursue a common North American currency with Canada and Mexico if confirmed as a Fed governor, and even apologize for comparing a currency forger’s challenge of the federal government’s dominance over money to civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks’ challenge of segregation laws.

“I apologize for the comparison. I truly do,” Shelton said of an incident raised by Alabama Democratic Senator Doug Jones in which a North Carolina man issued millions of dollars of his own precious-metal backed currency. “I believe he was testing the idea” that money needed to be backed by gold and silver, Shelton explained.

“Is that something you want to test?” Jones shot back, summing up committee concerns about past Shelton writings seeming to support a return to something like a gold or other asset-backed standard to keep the value of the dollar stable.

“No, senator,” said Shelton, a member of the Trump transition team and a long-time conservative author and commentator on financial issues.

It was one of a series of pointed exchanges between senators and Shelton, an economist with a long track record criticizing the Fed and questioning, at least in theory, whether central banks can even do the job assigned to them.

NOT IN THE MAINSTREAM

Four previous Trump appointees to the Fed failed to clear the Senate, a sign of the weight Congress has put on keeping the country’s monetary policy as free as possible of political interference, given Trump’s open verbal attacks on the Fed and demand for lower interest rates.

Asked about Trump’s war-by-tweet against the Fed, Shelton responded “I don’t censor what someone says.”

But during the hearing Pennsylvania Republican Senator Patrick Toomey called her views about using the Fed to manage the value of the dollar against other currencies “a very very dangerous path to go down.” Trump has often blamed the Fed for a rising dollar, which he argues has hurt exports. Shelton has often written about the need for a “sound” dollar.

A spokesman for Toomey said afterwards that the senator was undecided and that Shelton’s answers “didn’t alleviate” his concerns.

Alabama Senator Richard Shelby also “has not decided at this point, I know he still has some concerns,” the senator’s communications director, Blair Taylor, told Reuters.

Shelton, who holds a doctorate in business administration and has been sharply critical of the Federal Reserve in her writings and commentary, pledged broadly that she would be an independent thinker who would work well with existing Fed officials.

“I pledge to be independent in my decision-making, and frankly no one tells me what to do,” Shelton said, deflecting questions about her past writings that, for example, characterized the Fed’s setting of a short-term interest rate as similar to Soviet central planning.

“I don’t claim to be in the mainstream of economists….I would bring my own perspective. But I think the intellectual diversity strengthens the discussion.”

Senate Democrats said flatly that they do not trust her.

“Shelton has flip-flopped on too many issues to be confirmed,” said Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown. “She is far outside the mainstream. She is outside the ideological spectrum.”

TWO NOMINEES

A second nominee, Christopher Waller, a career economist who is currently the research director of the St. Louis Federal Reserve, faced few questions about his views.

Both were nominated by Trump to fill vacant seats on the Fed’s seven-member Washington-based Board of Governors.

Both Waller and Shelton released opening statements on Wednesday ahead of their hearings that offered few clues about their views on monetary policy beyond promising to promote policies that support financial stability and help the Fed meet its goals of full employment and price stability.

The two emphasized the Fed’s accountability to Congress, which oversees the central bank.

Both said they agreed with many of the opinions held by current Fed officials, including a reluctance to use negative interest rates as some other central banks have done, and a willingness to renew Fed bond purchases and expand the Fed’s balance sheet to fight a future downturn.For Waller, that is an extension of his 11 years working at the Fed and helping shape current policy as a key adviser to St. Louis Fed President James Bullard.

FILE PHOTO: The Federal Reserve building is pictured in Washington, DC, U.S., August 22, 2018. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

For Shelton, it was a seeming reversal from her earlier views that “quantitative easing” amounted to an inappropriate Fed intervention in markets that was inflating stock prices but doing little for the economy.

After cutting rates to zero, quantitative easing “is your only alternative,” Shelton said in response to a sharp and insistent series of questions from Louisiana Republican Senator John Kennedy on how she would respond to a downturn. Following the hearing, he remained undecided on whether to support Shelton’s nomination, according to an aide.

“It seems like you are taking a 180 degree position on all of this just to be appointed,” said Nevada Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. “Who are we getting?”

Additional reporting by Ann Saphir in San Francisco; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama, Dan Grebler and Andrea Ricci

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Exclusive: iPhone app makers questioned in U.S. antitrust probe of Apple – sources

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department has reached out to app developers as part of its investigation into Apple Inc (AAPL.O), one of the four big tech companies being probed for alleged anti-competitive behavior, according one of the developers and another person familiar with the investigation.

FILE PHOTO: An Apple logo hangs above the entrance to the Apple store on 5th Avenue in the Manhattan borough of New York City, July 21, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo

The chief executive of developer Mobicip, Suren Ramasubbu, told Reuters he was interviewed in November by a U.S. investigator who asked about the company’s interactions with Apple. The app, which has nearly a million users worldwide, allows parents to control what their children see on their iPhones.

Ramasubbu said the Mobicip app was temporarily removed from the iPhone app store last year for a failure to meet requirements imposed by Apple.

A source familiar with the Justice Department’s investigation said a handful of app developers had been contacted in what is the first indication of what officials are pursuing involving Apple since the investigation was revealed by Reuters in June.

U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized Apple’s Silicon Valley neighbors for other reasons, calling for closer scrutiny of social media companies and Google and accusing them of suppressing conservative voices online, without presenting any evidence.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said in December that he hoped to have the Justice Department investigations into the big tech platforms – Facebook Inc (FB.O), Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google, Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) and Apple – wrapped up this year.

Apple declined comment, but pointed to a statement on its website that says its app store was designed to hold apps “to a high standard for privacy, security and content.”

“Since 2016, we have removed over 1.4 million apps from the App Store because they have not been updated or don’t work on our most current operating systems,” the site says.

Apple’s ability to do just that has been a point of contention in the courtroom. The company was accused in lawsuits last year of abusing its clout in the app market. In one case, the U.S. Supreme Court gave the go-ahead last May to an antitrust lawsuit that accused Apple of forcing consumers to overpay for iPhone software applications.

SCREEN TIME CONTROL

Apple introduced its Screen Time app, which includes parental controls, in June 2018. At the start of 2019, Ramasubbu told Reuters, his company was contacted by Apple and warned that Mobicip’s app violated the iPhone-maker’s rules relating to technical elements that had previously been acceptable.

The app was removed from the app store for about six months, during which time it was updated to be compliant with Apple rules, Ramasubbu said. It was reinstated in October 2019, but he estimates his company’s business has shrunk by half.

Six executives of parental control app companies interviewed by Reuters said they had a comfortable relationship with Apple until mid-2018. That is when Apple introduced its own, similar software giving parents oversight of their children’s phone screen time and searches.

Apple has said that it had been concerned about parental control apps using technology which gave developers access to sensitive data, and that they declined to approve apps that used the technology if they did not also commit to not sharing data on children.

As the arbiter of who is allowed to sell in the app store, Apple says it has the power to ensure that only the highest quality apps are sold there.

But some developers say it also allows Apple to push out apps that compete with its own products, thus strengthening its profits at a time with its device sales have stagnated and it is seeking new sources of revenue.

Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Chris Sanders and Edward Tobin

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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U.S. importers stockpile Parmigiano, Provolone as tariffs on EU cheeses loom

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By Andrea Shalal and Aleksandra Michalska

Parmesan cheese is seen packaged within the warehouse at Ambriola Co Inc, a unit of Gennaro Auricchio SpA, one in every of Italy’s largest cheese producers, in West Caldwell, New Jersey, U.S., October 4, 2019. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

WASHINGTON/WEST CALDWELL, New Jersey (Reuters) – Ambriola Co Inc’s mammoth warehouse in West Caldwell, New Jersey, is crammed filled with packing containers and wheels of more durable cheeses similar to Parmigiano Reggiano, Pecorino Romano and Grana Padano – and extra is coming, tons extra.

Phil Marfuggi, president and chief government officer of Ambriola, a unit of Auricchio SpA, one in every of Italy’s largest cheese producers, is among the many many importers and store homeowners throughout the nation who’re scrambling to stockpile European cheeses earlier than new U.S. tariffs kick in on Oct. 18 in efforts to defend customers from worth hikes.

The Trump administration on Wednesday slapped 25% tariffs on cheese and different European Union merchandise starting from whisky to woolens, in retaliation for EU subsidies on giant plane. Either side say they’re open to negotiations, however commerce consultants see little likelihood of averting the duties – at the least within the quick run.

Importers started ordering tens of millions of {dollars} of additional wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano and different more durable cheeses after the U.S. Commerce Consultant’s workplace in July added cheese to its listing of EU merchandise doubtlessly going through tariffs because of the dispute over plane subsidies.

“When that listing got here out, that’s after I … began bringing in lots of extra containers of cheese of Reggiano, Provolone,” stated Marfuggi, who has one other 21 delivery containers filled with cheese en path to be added to the stockpile within the firm’s warehouse in Caldwell, which sits about 15 miles west of Manhattan.

Marfuggi stated he ordered an additional $15 million of cheeses that may very well be saved for over a 12 months to make sure satisfactory provides for current prospects and shield pricing via the tip of the 12 months.

“I’ve been build up stock … as a result of we’ve got a goal on our backs,” he stated.

The brand new duties may slash U.S. imports of EU cheeses valued at $1.5 billion a 12 months by 30% and jack up costs throughout the nation, stated Marfuggi, who additionally serves as president of the Cheese Importers Affiliation of America.

Some higher-priced objects will merely disappear from shops, he predicted, like Moliterno al Tartufo, an aged Italian cheese with an intense truffle taste. Even Parmigiano Reggiano may very well be in danger if costs rose to $30 a pound, he stated.

“There are going to be some objects … that the supermarkets are simply not going to deal with anymore. It’ll be worth prohibitive for that,” he stated.

The tariffs will hit shopper costs and finally jobs throughout the US, stated Ralph Hoffman, government vice chairman of Schuman Cheese, one of many largest importers of exhausting Italian cheeses.

Over 20,000 U.S. retail shops starting from Costco Wholesale Corp (COST.O) to Wegmans Meals Markets promote EU cheeses. These cheeses generate some $3.5 billion of income for U.S. firms, supporting some 20,000 jobs, together with patrons, deli clerks, truck drivers and warehouse employees, Hoffman stated. He famous that the brand new tariffs come on prime of current duties of round 15%.

Specialty grocer The Recent Market expects the tariffs to have an effect on about 35% of the 200 cheeses it carries at its 160 shops.

“We’re ready to see how the importers are going to move the associated fee alongside,” stated Andrew Harvell, who heads the corporate’s cheese division. “All the things’s nonetheless up within the air,” he stated, including that Recent Market had pre-ordered sufficient cheese to final via the vacation season, however may have to boost costs quickly thereafter.

Mike Bowers, the third-generation proprietor of a specialty cheese store at Washington’s storied Japanese Market, stated he started hoarding further wheels of exhausting cheeses – some weighing as a lot as 80 kilos – in July when USTR first introduced it may impose tariffs on cheese and different agricultural items.

His glass cheese counters, coolers and enormous walk-in fridge are stuffed to overflowing, however Bowers stated his provides won’t final via the vacation season. He stated he must move on the price of the tariffs.

“I’m a small man. I can’t purchase a $100 cheese and promote it for $50 and count on to remain in enterprise too lengthy,” he stated.

“I’ve a stockpile of cheese to be sure that I’m capable of preserve stock and preserve gross sales at my counter,” Bowers stated. “After which as time goes on, we’ll must see.”

He stated the standard of U.S. cheeses was bettering, offering good alternate options for some in style European cheeses, however he must discover methods to be extra “progressive” sooner or later.

He additionally has a stable choice available of Swiss cheeses that aren’t topic to EU tariffs, together with a Gruyere-style L’Etivaz, made in copper pots in line with historical custom.

Marfuggi stated it was a reduction that USTR opted for 25% tariffs as an alternative of the 100% charge initially proposed, however he worries that patrons would swap to home or different international provides if the tariffs stayed in place a very long time.

Slideshow (14 Photos)

“If that occurs, you’re going to lose a substantial quantity of shopper base, and it’s exhausting to win that again,” he stated.

And cheese hoarding can’t resolve all of the anticipated shortages, he warned. Many softer cheeses can’t be saved for almost as lengthy, so costs of these objects will seemingly rise rapidly.

“If you happen to’re a Gorgonzola lover, you’re positively out of luck,” Marfuggi stated.

Reporting by Andrea Shalal and Aleksandra Michalska; Extra reporting by Richa Naidu; Modifying by Heather Timmons and Leslie Adler

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Ideas.

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U.S. unemployment fee hits 3.5%; job development average

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WASHINGTON, (Reuters) – The U.S. unemployment fee dropped to close a 50-year low of three.5% in September, with job development growing reasonably, suggesting the slowing economic system may keep away from a recession for now regardless of commerce tensions which can be hammering manufacturing.

The Labor Division’s intently watched month-to-month employment report on Friday, nevertheless, contained reminders that the dangers to the longest financial enlargement on document remained tilted to the draw back. Wage development stagnated and manufacturing payrolls declined for the primary time in six months. The retail and utilities sectors additionally continued to shed jobs.

The report adopted a string of weak financial studies, together with a plunge in manufacturing exercise to greater than a 10-year low in September and a pointy slowdown in companies trade development to ranges final seen in 2016, that heightened fears the economic system was flirting with a recession.

“The unemployment fee normally rises forward of a recession, so a contemporary decline pushes out the timeline for any potential recession into late 2020 on the earliest,” mentioned Josh Wright, chief economist at iCIMS in New York.

The 2-tenths of a proportion level drop within the unemployment fee from 3.7% in August pushed it to its lowest stage since December 1969. The jobless fee, which had been caught at 3.7% for 3 straight months, declined at the same time as 117,000 folks entered the labor drive final month.

Nonfarm payrolls elevated by 136,000 jobs final month, the federal government’s survey of institutions confirmed. The economic system created 45,000 extra jobs in July and August than beforehand estimated. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast payrolls would improve by 145,000 jobs in September.

September’s job positive aspects have been under the month-to-month common of 161,000 this 12 months, however nonetheless above the roughly 100,000 wanted every month to maintain up with development within the working-age inhabitants. The smaller family survey from which the unemployment fee is derived confirmed a leap of 391,000 in employment in September.

With indicators that the Trump administration’s 15-month commerce warfare with China is spilling over to the broader economic system, continued labor market energy is a crucial buffer towards an financial downturn. The commerce warfare has eroded enterprise confidence, sinking funding and manufacturing.

There’s additionally political uncertainty in Washington after the Democratic-controlled U.S. Home of Representatives launched an impeachment inquiry towards President Donald Trump over accusations he pressed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to analyze former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, a number one candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

These components, along with benign wage inflation, are prone to immediate the Federal Reserve to chop rates of interest a minimum of yet one more time this 12 months, economists mentioned. The U.S. central financial institution minimize charges final month after decreasing borrowing prices in July for the primary time since 2008, to maintain the financial enlargement, now in its 11th 12 months, on observe.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell reiterated on Friday that the economic system was “in a superb place,” including that “our job is to maintain it there so long as attainable.”

The greenback .DXY was little modified towards a basket of currencies. Costs of U.S. Treasuries rose marginally. Shares on Wall Avenue have been buying and selling increased.

STRONG GOVERNMENT HIRING

“We proceed to count on the Fed to chop its goal rate of interest later this month,” mentioned Michael Feroli, an economist at JPMorgan in New York. “We imagine it will have taken a a lot stronger quantity to persuade Fed management that they’ve already taken out sufficient insurance coverage towards draw back dangers.”

Financial development estimates for the third quarter vary from as little as a 1.3% annualized fee to as excessive as a 1.9% tempo. The economic system grew at a 2.0% tempo within the second quarter, slowing from a 3.1% fee within the January-March interval.

Slower development was bolstered by a report from the Commerce Division on Friday that confirmed the U.S. commerce deficit widened 1.6% to $54.9 billion in August.

A broader measure of unemployment, which incorporates individuals who need to work however have given up looking and people working part-time as a result of they can not discover full-time employment, declined to six.9% final month, the bottom stage since December 2000, from 7.2% in August.

Regardless of the tight labor market, common hourly earnings have been unchanged final month after advancing 0.4% in August. That lowered the annual improve in wages to 2.9% from 3.2% in August. The common workweek was unchanged at 34.Four hours.

Some economists imagine wage development is stalling as a result of firms are hiring inexperienced staff within the face of labor shortages. Others blame the slowdown on ebbing demand for staff.

“With demand for labor softening and plenty of firms contending with increased enter prices because the commerce warfare lingers and broadens, we don’t count on to see any significant strengthening in wage development within the coming months,” mentioned Sarah Home, a senior economist at Wells Fargo Securities in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Hiring is slowing throughout all sectors, excluding authorities, which is being boosted by state and native authorities recruitment. Non-public payrolls elevated by 114,000 jobs in September after rising by 122,000 in August.

The three-month common acquire in personal employment fell to 119,000, the smallest since July 2012, from 135,000 in August.

Manufacturing shed 2,000 jobs final month, the primary decline in manufacturing unit payrolls since March, after a acquire of two,000 jobs in August. Manufacturing has paradoxically borne the brunt of the Trump administration’s commerce warfare, which the White Home has argued is meant to spice up the sector.

Final month’s decline in manufacturing payrolls was led by the automotive sector, which misplaced 4,100 jobs. Additional losses are possible if a strike by Basic Motors (GM.N) staff continues.

FILE PHOTO: A “Now Hiring” signal sits within the window of Tatte Bakery and Cafe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., February 11, 2019. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photograph/File Photograph/File Photograph

Building employment elevated by 7,000 jobs after rising by 4,000 in August. Retail payrolls fell by 11,400 jobs, marking an eighth straight month-to-month drop.

Authorities employment elevated by 22,000 jobs in September after surging by 46,000 in August. Hiring was boosted by state and native governments. Just one,000 staff have been employed final month for the 2020 Census. Authorities payrolls have elevated by 147,000 over the 12 months, pushed by native governments.

Reporting by Lucia Mutikani; Enhancing by Sandra Maler and Paul Simao

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Rules.

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Unique: Regulators weigh ‘startle components’ for Boeing 737 MAX pilot coaching – Transport Canada government

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MONTREAL/CHICAGO (Reuters) – World regulators are taking a look at “startle components” that may overwhelm pilots as they contemplate revised protocols for the Boeing 737 MAX, Nicholas Robinson, the top of civil aviation for Transport Canada, instructed Reuters on Friday.

FILE PHOTO: A employee walks previous unpainted Boeing 737 MAX plane seen parked in an aerial picture at Renton Municipal Airport close to the Boeing Renton facility in Renton, Washington, U.S. July 1, 2019. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson/File Photograph

Boeing Co’s fastest-selling jetliner, the 737 MAX, was grounded worldwide in March after two deadly crashes that killed a complete of 346 folks inside 5 months.

Pilot overload seems to have performed a task in each crashes, through which crews struggled to regain management of the airplane whereas a brand new flight management system repeatedly pushed the nostril down amid a collection of different audio and sensory alarms and alerts.

“What we have to do is be sure that the aircrew within the MAX are capable of deal with that atmosphere,” Robinson mentioned in an interview with Reuters.

Transport Canada is amongst a core group of regulators that’s evaluating the necessities for the 737 MAX to fly once more after a seven-month grounding.

It has been convening weekly by telephone, video conferences or face-to-face with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and its counterparts within the European Union and Brazil, Robinson mentioned.

Their selections may result in sweeping modifications to pilot flight working manuals and classroom instruction and even mandates for pricey simulator coaching, trade sources have mentioned.

Nevertheless, no coaching selections could be made till Boeing submits software program updates to the FAA for assessment and approval, Robinson mentioned.

Transport Canada is carefully aligned with the European Union Aviation Security Company on return to service calls for and has additionally raised questions over the structure behind the 737 MAX’s angle of assault system.

“We proceed to search for an answer proposed by the producer and the FAA on that space,” he mentioned.

Nonetheless, Canada’s purpose is for the MAX to return in international locations throughout the globe concurrently, or a minimum of in shut succession.

“It’s not a necessity, but it surely’s a purpose,” Robinson mentioned.

PILOT WORKLOAD

A startle or shock within the cockpit can endanger a pilot’s potential to take care of management of the plane and was mentioned to play a task in earlier air crashes like Air France flight 447 in 2009.

The identical yr, Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger safely landed a US Airways flight on the Hudson River in New York after a hen strike disabled the engines. He instructed lawmakers in June that the 737 MAX crew may have been confused as they struggled to take care of management of the plane.

“I can inform you firsthand that the startle issue is actual and it’s big. It completely interferes with one’s potential to shortly analyze the disaster and take corrective motion,” Sullenberger mentioned.

Below new simulator situations, 737 MAX pilots worldwide could also be skilled on runaway stabilizer, a lack of management that was triggered in each 737 MAX crashes, coupled with some type of sudden malfunction.

“The one strategy to successfully take care of the bodily and psychological reactions of ‘startle impact’ is to have beforehand been uncovered to it,” mentioned Captain Larry Rooney, president of the Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations.

The purpose of introducing startles is to show pilots how to answer “struggle, flight or freeze” instincts in an atmosphere the place the results will not be life threatening, mentioned Rooney. The one strategy to prepare for startle is in a simulator or in actual life.

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg on Wednesday acknowledged that Boeing’s flight management software program, activated off defective information from a key airflow sensor, contributed to a broader chain of occasions that created extra workload for the pilots in 737 MAX crashes.

The planemaker, which is concentrating on a 737 MAX return to service within the fourth quarter, has began displaying pilots and regulators its proposed software program replace and coaching program at data periods in Miami, London, Istanbul, Shanghai and Singapore scheduled to run via mid-October.

Reporting by Allison Lampert in Montreal and Tracy Rucinski in Chicago; Further reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle; Modifying by Matthew Lewis

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Rules.

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Trump considers delisting Chinese language companies from U.S. markets: sources

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump’s administration is contemplating delisting Chinese language firms from U.S. inventory exchanges, three sources briefed on the matter stated on Friday, in what can be a radical escalation of U.S.-China commerce tensions.

The transfer can be a part of a broader effort to restrict U.S. funding in Chinese language firms, two of the sources stated. One stated it was motivated by the Trump administration’s rising safety considerations in regards to the firms’ actions.

Main U.S. inventory indexes slipped on the information, which got here days earlier than China celebrates the 70th anniversary of the start of the Individuals’s Republic on Oct. 1, when the world’s No. 2 financial system will shut down for per week of festivities.

Shares of Hangzhou, Zhejiang-based Alibaba (BABA.N) ended down 5.15%. JD.com (JD.O) fell 5.95% and Baidu Inc (BIDU.O) declined 3.67%. The iShares China Massive-Cap ETF (FXI.P) shed 1.15%.

Shares of New York Inventory Alternate-owner Intercontinental Alternate Inc (ICE.N) ended down 1.88% and shares of Nasdaq Inc (NDAQ.O) declined 1.70%.

It was not instantly clear how any delisting would work.

In June, U.S. lawmakers from each events launched a invoice to drive Chinese language firms listed on American inventory exchanges to undergo regulatory oversight, together with offering entry to audits, or face delisting.

Chinese language authorities have lengthy been reluctant to let abroad regulators examine native accounting companies – together with member companies of the Massive 4 worldwide accounting networks – citing nationwide safety considerations.

“Beijing ought to not be allowed to defend U.S.-listed Chinese language firms from complying with American legal guidelines and laws for monetary transparency and accountability,” Republican Senator Marco Rubio stated on the time.

One of many sources briefed on the matter stated the concept of delisting was the newest salvo on this longstanding dispute.

“It is a very excessive precedence for the administration. Chinese language firms not complying with the PCAOB (Public Firm Accounting Oversight Board) course of poses dangers to U.S. traders,” the supply stated.

Any plan is topic to approval by Trump, who has given the inexperienced mild to the dialogue, Bloomberg reported right here citing an individual near the deliberations.

Officers are additionally analyzing how the USA might put limits on Chinese language firms included in inventory indexes managed by U.S. companies, the company cited three sources as saying.

No resolution or motion is imminent, two sources conversant in the discussions advised Reuters.

As of February, 156 Chinese language firms have been listed on the NASDAQ and New York Inventory Exchanges, in line with U.S. authorities information, together with no less than 11 state-owned companies. (bit.ly/2nUXQaD)

NYSE declined to touch upon Friday, whereas Nasdaq, MSCI, S&P and FTSE Russell didn’t instantly reply to requests for remark.

FILE PHOTO: Merchants work on the ground on the New York Inventory Alternate (NYSE) in New York, U.S., September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

China’s yuan foreign money, traded in offshore markets CNH=, fell in opposition to the greenback after the information to commerce close to its weakest in opposition to the buck in about three weeks.

PLOY?

Commerce talks between the USA and China are anticipated to be held Oct. 10-11 after months of tit-for-tat strikes by each side which have weakened international development and pushed rollercoaster strikes in markets.

Whereas the concept of delisting could possibly be a maneuver forward of these talks, the principle purpose was to counteract the civilian-military fusion of Chinese language know-how companies, the Made in China 2025 industrial improvement program concentrating on key industries for domination and a rising surveillance state in Xinjiang, one of many sources stated.

The supply stated there are longstanding considerations about U.S. capital enabling these actions, particularly because the strains blur between state-owned and personal firms in China.

“It’s all very disruptive, it simply provides to uncertainty and it’s a giant unfavorable for enterprise funding,” stated Scott Brown, chief economist at funding financial institution Raymond James. He famous, nevertheless, that each side have used aggressive strikes up to now forward of talks.

“You by no means know if it’s a ploy to get some leverage,” he stated.

Trump on Tuesday criticized Beijing’s commerce practices in a speech on the United Nations, however the subsequent day stoked hopes that the almost 15-month standoff could possibly be nearing an finish.

“They need to make a deal very badly … It might occur prior to you assume,” he advised reporters in New York on Wednesday.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a photograph alternative with sheriffs from throughout the nation on the South Garden of the White Home in Washington, U.S., September 26, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott

China says it can’t enable its firms to undergo oversight by PCOAB due to guidelines prohibiting the storage, processing or switch of any materials thought of to be state secrets and techniques or nationwide safety issues.

U.S. hedge fund supervisor Kyle Bass, a distinguished critic of China, stated on Friday that Chinese language firms ought to should play by U.S. guidelines in the event that they need to promote to U.S. traders.

“The U.S. ought to require any securities offered within the US to stick to US Securities Legal guidelines. Loopy huh?” Bass wrote on Twitter.

Reporting by Alexandra Alper, Patricia Zengerle, Chris Sanders and Andrea Shalal in Washington and Shubham Kalia, Supantha Mukherjee and Ambar Warwick in Bengaluru; Writing by Sonya Hepinstall; Enhancing by Arun Koyyur, Patrick Graham and Daniel Wallis

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Rules.

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Trump says he doesn’t need struggle after assault on Saudi oil amenities

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WASHINGTON/DUBAI (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump stated on Monday stated it appeared like Iran was behind assaults on oil vegetation in Saudi Arabia however burdened he didn’t need to go to struggle, because the assaults despatched oil costs hovering and raised fears of a brand new Center East battle.

Iran has rejected U.S. fees it was behind the strikes on Saturday that broken the world’s largest crude-processing plant and triggered the biggest soar in crude costs in many years.

Relations between the US and Iran have deteriorated since Trump pulled out of the Iran nuclear accord final yr and reimposed sanctions over Tehran’s nuclear and ballistic applications. Washington additionally needs to stress Tehran to finish its assist of regional proxy forces, together with in Yemen the place Saudi forces have been preventing Iran-backed Houthis for 4 years.

America was nonetheless investigating if Iran was behind the Saudi strikes, Trump stated, however “it’s definitely trying that manner at this second.”

Trump, who has spent a lot of his presidency making an attempt to disentangle the US from wars he inherited, made clear, nonetheless, he was not going to hurry into a brand new battle on behalf of Saudi Arabia.

“I’m any person that would love to not have struggle,” Trump stated.

A number of U.S. Cupboard members, together with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Vitality Secretary Rick Perry, have blamed Tehran for the strikes. Pompeo and others will journey to Saudi Arabia quickly, Trump stated.

A day after saying the US was “locked and loaded” to reply to the incident, Trump stated on Monday there was “no rush” to take action.

“We’ve got a whole lot of choices however I’m not taking a look at choices proper now. We need to discover definitively who did this,” he stated.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani stated the strikes had been carried out by “Yemeni folks” retaliating for assaults by a Saudi-led navy coalition in a struggle with the Houthi motion.

“Yemeni persons are exercising their professional proper of protection,” Rouhani instructed reporters throughout a go to to Ankara.

Iranian Overseas Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi referred to as the allegations “unacceptable and completely baseless.”

The assaults lower 5% of world crude oil manufacturing.

Oil costs surged by as a lot as 19% after the incidents however later got here off their peaks. The intraday soar was the most important for the reason that 1990-91 Gulf disaster over Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait.

The market eased from its peak after Trump stated he would launch U.S. emergency provides and producers stated there have been sufficient shares saved up worldwide to make up for the shortfall. Costs had been round 12% larger by afternoon in the US.

SAUDI SUSPICIONS

Saudi Arabia stated the assaults had been carried out with Iranian weapons, including that it was able to responding forcefully and urging U.N. consultants to assist examine the raid.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman stated Iranian threats weren’t solely directed towards the dominion however towards the Center East and the world.

Whereas the prince didn’t immediately accuse Tehran, a Overseas Ministry assertion reported him as calling on the worldwide group to sentence whoever was behind the strike.

“The dominion is able to defending its land and folks and responding forcefully to these assaults,” the assertion added.

Saudi Arabia and Iran have been enemies for many years and are preventing quite a lot of proxy wars.

Trump stated he had not made commitments to guard the Saudis.

A satellite tv for pc picture displaying injury to grease/gasoline Saudi Aramco infrastructure at Khurais, in Saudi Arabia on this handout image launched by the usGovernment September 15, 2019. U.S. Authorities/DigitalGlobe/Handout through REUTERS

“No, I haven’t promised Saudis that. We’ve got to sit down down with the Saudis and work one thing out,” he stated. “That was an assault on Saudi Arabia, and that wasn’t an assault on us. However we would definitely assist them.”

Two sources briefed on state oil firm Saudi Aramco’s operations instructed Reuters it’d take months for Saudi oil manufacturing to return to regular. Earlier estimates had advised it may take weeks.

Saudi Arabia stated it will be capable to meet oil clients’ demand from its ample storage, though some deliveries had been disrupted. At the very least 11 supertankers had been ready to load oil cargoes from Saudi ports, ship monitoring information confirmed on Monday.

RISING TENSIONS

Stress within the oil-producing Gulf area has dramatically escalated this yr after Trump imposed extreme U.S. sanctions on Iran geared toward halting its oil exports altogether.

For months, Iranian officers have issued veiled threats, saying that if Tehran is blocked from exporting oil, different international locations will be unable to take action both. However Iran has denied a task in particular assaults, together with bombings of tankers within the Gulf and former strikes claimed by the Houthis.

U.S. allies in Europe oppose Trump’s “most stress” technique, arguing that it gives no clear mechanism to resolve points, making a danger the enemies may stumble into struggle.

Trump has stated his aim is to drive Iran to barter a more durable settlement and has left open the opportunity of talks with Rouhani at an upcoming U.N. assembly. Iran says there may be no talks till Washington lifts sanctions.

U.N. Yemen envoy Martin Griffiths instructed the U.N. Safety Council on Monday it was “not fully clear” who was behind the strike however he stated it had elevated the possibilities of a regional battle.

However the U.S. ambassador to the world physique, Kelly Craft, stated rising info on the assaults “signifies that duty lies with Iran” and that there isn’t any proof the assault got here from Yemen.

Iran’s Yemeni allies have promised extra strikes to return. Houthi navy spokesman Yahya Sarea stated the group carried out Saturday’s predawn assault with drones, together with some powered by jet engines.

“We guarantee the Saudi regime that our lengthy arm can attain anyplace we select and on the time of our selecting,” Sarea tweeted. “We warn firms and foreigners towards being close to the vegetation that we struck as a result of they’re nonetheless in our sights.”

Slideshow (11 Pictures)

U.S. officers say they consider that the assaults got here from the wrong way, presumably from Iran itself reasonably than Yemen, and will have concerned cruise missiles. Wherever the assaults had been launched, nonetheless, they consider Iran is guilty.

The assaults have raised questions on how the dominion, one of many world’s high spenders on weaponry, a lot of it equipped by U.S. firms, was unable to guard oil vegetation from assault.

Sensing a business opening, President Vladimir Putin stated Russia was prepared to assist Saudi Arabia by offering Russian-made air protection techniques to guard Saudi infrastructure.

Russia and China stated it was unsuitable to leap to conclusions about who was guilty for the assault on Saudi Arabia.

Reporting by Steve Holland in Washington and Rania El Gamal in Dubai; Writing by William Maclean, Mike Collett-White and Doina Chiacu; Modifying by Alistair Bell and Peter Cooney

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Ideas.

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U.S., Chinese language commerce deputy talks to start out on Thursday: USTR

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Deputy-level U.S.-China commerce talks are scheduled to start out in Washington on Thursday, the U.S. Commerce Consultant’s workplace mentioned on Monday, paving the way in which for high-level talks in October aimed toward resolving a bitter commerce struggle.

FILE PHOTO: Chinese language and U.S. flags flutter close to The Bund, earlier than U.S. commerce delegation meet their Chinese language counterparts for talks in Shanghai, China July 30, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Tune/File Photograph/File Photograph

A USTR spokesman didn’t provide any additional particulars concerning the deputy-level talks.

Earlier, U.S. Chamber of Commerce chief government Tom Donohue mentioned that U.S. Commerce Consultant Lighthizer instructed enterprise executives that he was in search of a “actual settlement” that addresses mental property and know-how switch points first raised by the USTR two years in the past.

Donohue, talking at a information convention to induce congressional approval of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada commerce settlement, mentioned that Lighthizer “did point out that there was some motion within the path of buying of (U.S.) agricultural merchandise and different points.”

However Lighthizer gave no indication that the talks could produce an interim take care of a extra restricted scope, as instructed by some media stories, Donohue mentioned.

The top of the largest U.S. enterprise lobbying group added that it might be troublesome to safe an settlement that absolutely addresses U.S. calls for for sweeping adjustments to China’s mental property and know-how switch practices, market entry and subsidy points.

“Whereas I’m optimistic about it, I’m additionally a dead-ass realist and this isn’t a easy drawback,” Donohue mentioned of the brand new spherical of talks.

Lighthizer and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are anticipated to satisfy with China’s high negotiator, Vice Premier Liu He, in early October.

President Donald Trump final week delayed a tariff improve that had been scheduled for Oct. 1 on $250 billion price of Chinese language items after China additionally delayed tariffs on some U.S. imports.

The world’s two largest economies haven’t held in-person talks since late July towards resolving their 14-month commerce struggle, which has roiled markets, disrupted provide chains and threatened world progress.

Financial elements are weighing on either side, mentioned Stephen Kho, former performing chief counsel on China enforcement at USTR who’s now a companion at Akin Gump regulation agency.

“Each side are feeling the ache now. So an interim deal could possibly be carried out, but when they’re on the lookout for a complete deal … that can be very laborious,” Kho mentioned.

Reporting by David Lawder, Further reporting by Andrea Shalal; Enhancing by Angus MacSwan, Dan Grebler and Sandra Maler

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Ideas.

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