Tag Archives: social media

Official rips critics for assault on daughter with COVID-19

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A Florida county commissioner is firing again at an anti-mask critic’s social media response to her announcement that her 19-year-old daughter was handled for COVID-19

After Palm Seashore County Commissioner Melissa McKinlay introduced Tuesday that her 19-year-old daughter was within the emergency room with COVID-19, Boca Raton resident Rachel Eade posted photos and video on Fb taken from the commissioner’s daughter’s Instagram web page.

In a single picture Eade grabbed from the teenager’s Instagram account, McKinlay’s daughter exhibits off a tattoo. She lip-syncs with a good friend in a video. And a Sept. 6 photograph exhibits her with a good friend, with neither sporting a masks.

Tattoo parlors have reopened throughout a lot of Florida and it isn’t clear when the daughter obtained the tattoo. Additionally, McKinlay says her daughter is following all protocols on the College of Central Florida in Orlando the place she attends courses.

Three days after the Sept. 6 photograph, she was examined for the coronavirus and discovered every week later she was optimistic, the commissioner stated. McKinlay’s take a look at was unfavourable.

Eade has pushed for reopening shuttered companies and joined a lawsuit to quash the county’s masks coverage, the Palm Seashore Put up reported.

After Eade’s put up, McKinlay shot again with a fiery missive of her personal on her county fee Fb web page at these accusing her daughter of wrongdoing.

“My God, the hate on this group is absurd,” she wrote. “You need to be ashamed of it. I don’t give a rattling in the event you don’t vote for me once more. Your vote isn’t one I need.”

McKinlay, a Democrat, gained re-election to a second four-year fee time period in 2018, and can be compelled out by time period limits in 2022.

Eade instructed the newspaper she made the put up to carry McKinlay accountable as a result of it was “no totally different” than when commissioners used pictures of individuals flouting COVID-19 guidelines at nightclubs to “make a degree that ‘well being recommendation’ was not being heeded.”

“As a consultant of the individuals, this board can not count on to cease the world, shutter companies in our group, destroy livelihoods, take meals off the plates of households and youngsters, prohibit the respiration and motion of a complete group, and never count on there to be people who examine whether or not their actions again up their phrases,” Eade instructed the newspaper.

Critics of the county’s measures to regulate the coronavirus shortly added their very own ideas to Eade’s Fb put up.

Josie Machovec, a fellow plaintiff within the masks mandate lawsuit, wrote that the put up made her “rageful as a result of she (McKinlay) expects all of us to alter our conduct to ‘shield’ her baby. However after we carry up the truth that these issues can and do hurt our youngsters she doesn’t care. Solely her baby’s consolation is vital.”

Eade known as McKinlay’s announcement about her daughter Tuesday a “partial sob story.”

“As a mom, I definitely want no baby unwell, however now we have to ask why she feels her personal baby will not be certain by the principles she is creating and attempting to implement?” Eade wrote.

McKinlay stated her daughter will not be defying coronavirus protocols.

“She was dwelling with me all summer time. She adopted the principles, she wore her masks, she washed her palms,” McKinlay stated. Her daughter attends the College of Central Florida in Orlando, the place her mom says she is adhering to the colleges coronavirus insurance policies.

“She takes that risk significantly,” McKinlay stated. “She finds it completely ridiculous and laughable that persons are making these accusations.”

In an Instagram put up made Thursday, the daughter stated she probably contracted the virus from a good friend of her roommate who visited their Orlando house.

“This could present lots of you, that leaping to conclusions can usually depart you wanting fairly dense. Possibly in the event you put half the time you spent stalking a school woman’s Instagram, into worrying about extra vital issues happening on this planet, you could possibly assist a trigger in want,” she wrote, attaching hyperlinks to wildfire reduction, baby trafficking consciousness, dependancy prevention and Black Lives Matter.

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Observe AP protection of the pandemic at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak.

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Celebs be part of Instagram ‘freeze’ to protest Fb inaction

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Celebrities together with Kim Kardashian West, Katy Perry and Leonardo DiCaprio are participating in a 24-hour Instagram “freeze” on Wednesday

LONDON — Kim Kardashian West, Katy Perry, Leonardo DiCaprio and different celebrities are participating in a 24-hour Instagram “freeze” on Wednesday to protest in opposition to what they are saying is mum or dad firm Fb’s failure to deal with violent and hateful content material and election misinformation.

Hollywood stars and influencers are lending their backing to the “#StopHateforProfit” motion’s newest marketing campaign. The motion asks folks to place up a message highlighting what they referred to as the harm Fb does however in any other case chorus from posting on Instagram for a day.

“I can’t sit by and keep silent whereas these platforms proceed to permit the spreading of hate, propaganda and misinformation – created by teams to sow division and break up America aside – solely to take steps after persons are killed,” Kardashian West posted on her Instagram account on Tuesday.

Fb declined to remark however pointed to latest bulletins about what it is doing to restrict the attain on its platform of teams that assist violence and its efforts to guard the U.S. election in November.

With 188 million followers, Kardashian West is without doubt one of the most influential folks on Instagram and assist from her and different massive names for the boycott noticed Fb shares slide in aftermarket buying and selling late Tuesday. They have been down 1.7% forward of the market open on Wednesday.

The organizers behind “#StopHateforProfit,” together with civil rights teams such because the Anti-Defamation League, the NAACP and Colour Of Change, had beforehand led a marketing campaign that bought tons of of manufacturers and nonprofits to affix a Fb promoting boycott in July.

Ashton Kutcher, Mark Ruffalo, Kerry Washington, Rosario Dawson, Jamie Foxx and Sacha Baron Cohen have been amongst about two dozen Hollywood stars and celeb influencers supporting the marketing campaign, the organizers stated.

DiCaprio stated he was standing with the civil rights teams to name “on all customers of Instagram and Fb to protest the amplification of hate, racism, and the undermining of democracy on these platforms.”

Fb, which earned almost $70 billion in promoting income final 12 months, is going through a reckoning over what critics name indefensible excuses for amplifying divisions, hate and misinformation on their platforms.

“We’re rapidly approaching one of the vital consequential elections in American historical past,” organizers stated. “Fb’s unchecked and imprecise ‘modifications’ are falling dangerously quick of what’s crucial to guard our democracy.”

The motion additionally singled out for criticism Fb’s dealing with of on-line materials forward of the shootings in Kenosha, Wisconsin final month. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has stated the corporate made a mistake in not eradicating sooner a web page belonging to a militia group that referred to as for armed civilians to enter the city. It solely took the web page down after an armed teenager killed two folks after violent protests sparked by the police taking pictures of Jacob Blake, who’s Black.

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For all of AP’s tech protection, go to https://apnews.com/apf-technology

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Observe Kelvin Chan at twitter.com/chanman



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Google warns Australians could lose free search services

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Google has warned that the Australian government’s plans to make digital giants pay for news content threatens users’ free services in Australia and could hand users’ data to media organizations

CANBERRA, Australia —
Google warned on Monday that the Australian government’s plans to make digital giants pay for news content threatens users’ free services in Australia and could hand users’ data to media organizations.

The U.S.-based company’s warning, contained in what it called an “Open letter to Australians,” comes a week before public consultations close on Australian draft laws that would make both Google and Facebook pay for news siphoned from commercial media companies.

“A proposed law … would force us to provide you with a dramatically worse Google Search and YouTube, could lead to your data being handed over to big news businesses, and would put the free services you use at risk in Australia,” Google Australia and New Zealand managing director Mel Silva wrote.

Google owns YouTube, a video-sharing platform.

Both Google and Facebook have condemned the proposed legislation, which was released last month and aims to succeed where other countries have failed in making them compensate media businesses for news content.

Australian competition watchdog Rod Sims, chair of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, which drafted the laws, said Google’s letter “contains misinformation.”

“Google will not be required to charge Australians for the use of its free services such as Google Search and YouTube, unless it chooses to do so,” Sims said in a statement.

“Google will not be required to share any additional user data with Australian news businesses unless it chooses to do so,” he added.

Australian Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, the minister responsible for the consumer watchdog, said in a statement that the draft law “remains open for consultation, providing an opportunity for media companies and digital platforms to provide feedback” until Aug. 28.

Swinburne University senior lecturer on media Belinda Barnet described the Google letter as a “cynical exercise” designed to “scare Google users.”

“I see no merit in any of the arguments,” she said.

“One of the most ironic arguments is that they’re going to have to hand over some data to news organizations — for example which article people have read and how long they may have read it for — and this coming from the world’s major privacy violator and certainly the world’s largest data aggregator is a bit rich,” Barnet added.

Google has been battling the Australian consumer watchdog on two fronts. Last month, the watchdog launched court action against Google for allegedly misleading account holders about its use of their personal data.

The commission alleges that Google misled millions of Australians to obtain their consent and expand the scope of personal information that it collects about users’ internet activity to target advertising. Google denies the allegations.

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Insider Q&A: Facebook VP of Messenger discusses privacy

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Government officials worry about Facebook’s plans to extend end-to-end encryption to Messenger

SAN FRANCISCO —
At Facebook, Stan Chudnovsky oversees the Messenger chat app that’s used by well over 1 billion people each month. He’s playing a key role in helping Facebook integrate that app with its other chat tools, WhatsApp and Instagram Direct.

The massive project has already gotten pushback from regulators worried about Facebook’s size and power. Government officials also worry about Facebook’s plans to extend end-to-end encryption to Messenger. Once that happens, Facebook wouldn’t be able to respond to law enforcement subpoenas because it wouldn’t have a way to unscramble messages.

Chudnovsky, who moved to the U.S. from Russia in 1994, joined Facebook in 2015. He spoke with The Associated Press recently about his work and views on privacy. Questions and answers have been edited for length and clarity.

Q: What are the biggest roadblocks in bringing end-to-end encryption?

A: It’s technologically hard to move from the system that is alive and functioning and has billions of messages being sent every day to where it’s done completely differently architecturally. We also need to figure out how to do as much as we can on safety, while being the leaders on privacy. We are trying to go through that process slowly and very responsibly while talking to everyone.

Most messages in the U.S., where (Apple’s) iMessage is leading, are already end-to-end encrypted. We want to make sure that we get to the point when we lead very strongly and we do as much on safety as we possibly can given the constraints of end-to-end encryption.

Q: How do you ensure that people are safe when you can’t see bad things people are doing?

A: We are going to continue to work very closely with law enforcement on whatever we can provide. We also have connectivity to social networks. Whoever is a bad player on social networks, we will be able to see if those bad players exist on messaging services.

I don’t want to go into details on how we are thinking about approaching that stuff. But we’re just going to invest heavily in identifying threats earlier,

Q: You can send things in a private message that you can’t post on Facebook, right?

A: Definitely. You should be able to send whatever you want to send in a private message.

Q: What if it’s illegal or hurting someone?

A: Generally we believe that conversation between people should be private. We don’t make a difference between the conversations that are happening in the living room or on the phone and conversations that are happening in a private chat.

Q: What if you try to sell a gun, despite Facebook’s ban?

A: If you’re trying to sell a gun, you are probably trying to sell a gun to many people. When someone reports that and someone provides the messages that from the point of that person are illegal, then definitely we will be able to look at that.

Q: What are the biggest things that you have to figure out before interoperability becomes reality?

A: Generally, just a features compatibility in the sense that, if I “like” some message on one app, how does it manifest itself in another? Or will I be able to also call people, not only send messages?

Q: Do you think scrutiny of Facebook will ease any time soon?

A: We have a lot of responsibility. And the criticism, sometimes it’s accurate. Sometimes it’s not accurate. At the end of the day, what it means if everyone’s talking about you positively or negatively or both, is that you’re important. We just need to continue to deliver value to people. And as long as we are building products that people like. I think it’s going to be fine.

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Focus turns to Latino authors amid ‘American Dirt’ debate

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Latino activists say they hope the controversy around the novel “American Dirt” brings more attention to recent and overlooked works by Latino writers

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. —
When Oprah Winfrey endorsed the novel “American Dirt” for her book club last month, many Latinos took to social media to decry the selection for its stereotypes and caricatures.

The novel about a Mexican mother and her young son fleeing to the U.S. border had been praised widely before its Jan. 21 release. But anger built over “American Dirt” by Jeanine Cummins — a writer who primarily identifies as white — and Latinos shared reading lists and pointed to recent work that went overlooked, offering “alternative” options for those who wanted to read about the Latino experience in the United States.

Across the U.S., Latino writers say they are seeing a jump in sales of those works following social media campaigns to draw more attention to Latino literature as big New York publishers face criticism for ignoring the work or not promoting it enough.

Nicolas Kanellos, founder and publisher of Houston-based Arte Publico Press, the largest publisher of Hispanic literature in the U.S., said he noticed last month some of his books by immigrant writers selling out.

“I’m not on Twitter but my staff told me some of our books were appearing on these lists as suggestions,” Kanellos said. “They are gone now.”

Journalist and novelist Luis Alberto Urrea, who Cummings cited as an influence, reported seeing sales of his early 2019 novel “The House of Broken Angels” jump to his surprise. It was one of the books mentioned on social media.

“Thank you. #14 on the LA Times bestseller list. Again,” Urrea wrote on Facebook. “Big Angel keeps coming back.”

Wendy C. Ortiz’s memoir “Excavation” in California’s San Fernando Valley also sold out on Amazon.

Others suggested readers buy the novel “Dominicana” by New York-born Angie Cruz and El Paso-born Sergio Troncoso’s short story collection, “A Peculiar Kind of Immigrant Son” — works released last year.

PEN-award winner and Fresno, California-born writer Daniel Chacón’s “Kafka in a Skirt: Stories from the Wall” also was recommended as a work to understand life on the borderlands. The collection was sought out as comfort following the August 2019 killing of 22 people in a shooting that targeted Mexicans in El Paso, Texas.

In addition, Latino advocates told followers to look out for new work from memoirist and essayist Luis J. Rodriguez, who released on last month, “From Our Land to Our Land: Essays, Journeys and Imaginings From a Native Xicanx Writer.”

“I’ve seen interest in my new book. Yeah, people are asking about it,” said Matt Sedillo, a Los Angeles-based poet and author of “Mowing Leaves of Grass.” He’s also getting more offers to visit colleges to read his work.

Myriam Gurba, a Long Beach, California-based writer who has been a vocal critic of Cummins, said she saw “no silver lining” in the controversy of “American Dirt.” She said readers should have been picking up books by Latinos writers anyway.

Gurba and a group of other Latino writers called #DignidadLiteraria met with publisher Macmillan (Flatiron Books, which published “American Dirt,” is a division of Macmillan) this week to demand the publisher hire more Latino staff.

Domingo Garcia, national president of the Latino civil rights group the League of United Latin American Citizens, said he didn’t have a problem with non-Latinos writing about immigration. “But it’s important to have a conversation with publishers about who is getting published and the lack of Latinos in the industry,” he said.

In New Mexico, the state with the largest percentage of Hispanic residents, the conversation shifted this week from “American Dirt” to Levi Romero. The bilingual Spanish-English poet was named as the state’s inaugural poet laureate. He will document his travels around the state to promote poetry through a web journal and podcast.

Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez, an Albuquerque-based writer and author of “One Day I’ll Tell You the Things I’ve Seen,” said he’s happy Latino works are getting recognized but he hopes the interests doesn’t die down. “Let’s not be angry for two weeks and forget about it,” Vaquera-Vásquez said. “Let’s be angry for months.”

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Russell Contreras is a member of The Associated Press’ race and ethnicity team. Follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras



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Shanghai government to help Tesla resume production amid coronavirus epidemic

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FILE PICTURE: Tesla China-made Model 3 vehicles are seen during a delivery event at its factory in Shanghai, China Jan. 7, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – U.S. electric carmaker Tesla’s (TSLA.O) factory in China’s financial hub of Shanghai will resume production on Feb. 10 with assistance to help it cope with a spreading epidemic of coronavirus, a Shanghai government official said on Saturday.

Many factories across China shut in late January for the Lunar New Year holiday that was originally due to end on Jan. 30 but which was extended in a bid to contain the spread of the new flu-like virus that has killed more than 700 people.

Tesla warned on Jan. 30 that it would see a 1-1.5 week delay in the ramp-up of Shanghai-built Model 3 cars as a result of the epidemic, which has severely disrupted communications and supply chains across China.

Tesla Vice President Tao Lin said this week that production would restart on Feb. 10.

“In view of the practical difficulties key manufacturing firms including Tesla have faced in resuming production, we will coordinate to make all efforts to help companies resume production as soon as possible,” Shanghai municipal government spokesman Xu Wei said.

The $2 billion Shanghai factory is Tesla’s first outside the United States and was built with support from local authorities. It started production in October and began deliveries last month.

The Shanghai government also said on Saturday it would ask banks to extend loans with preferential rates to small companies and exempt firms in hard-hit sectors like hospitality from value-added tax, among other measures to prop up businesses during the epidemic.

Such assistance would also apply to foreign companies, it added.

Reporting by Brenda Goh and Samuel Shen; Editing by Kenneth Maxwell and Stephen Coates

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Exclusive: iPhone app makers questioned in U.S. antitrust probe of Apple – sources

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department has reached out to app developers as part of its investigation into Apple Inc (AAPL.O), one of the four big tech companies being probed for alleged anti-competitive behavior, according one of the developers and another person familiar with the investigation.

FILE PHOTO: An Apple logo hangs above the entrance to the Apple store on 5th Avenue in the Manhattan borough of New York City, July 21, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo

The chief executive of developer Mobicip, Suren Ramasubbu, told Reuters he was interviewed in November by a U.S. investigator who asked about the company’s interactions with Apple. The app, which has nearly a million users worldwide, allows parents to control what their children see on their iPhones.

Ramasubbu said the Mobicip app was temporarily removed from the iPhone app store last year for a failure to meet requirements imposed by Apple.

A source familiar with the Justice Department’s investigation said a handful of app developers had been contacted in what is the first indication of what officials are pursuing involving Apple since the investigation was revealed by Reuters in June.

U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized Apple’s Silicon Valley neighbors for other reasons, calling for closer scrutiny of social media companies and Google and accusing them of suppressing conservative voices online, without presenting any evidence.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said in December that he hoped to have the Justice Department investigations into the big tech platforms – Facebook Inc (FB.O), Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google, Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) and Apple – wrapped up this year.

Apple declined comment, but pointed to a statement on its website that says its app store was designed to hold apps “to a high standard for privacy, security and content.”

“Since 2016, we have removed over 1.4 million apps from the App Store because they have not been updated or don’t work on our most current operating systems,” the site says.

Apple’s ability to do just that has been a point of contention in the courtroom. The company was accused in lawsuits last year of abusing its clout in the app market. In one case, the U.S. Supreme Court gave the go-ahead last May to an antitrust lawsuit that accused Apple of forcing consumers to overpay for iPhone software applications.

SCREEN TIME CONTROL

Apple introduced its Screen Time app, which includes parental controls, in June 2018. At the start of 2019, Ramasubbu told Reuters, his company was contacted by Apple and warned that Mobicip’s app violated the iPhone-maker’s rules relating to technical elements that had previously been acceptable.

The app was removed from the app store for about six months, during which time it was updated to be compliant with Apple rules, Ramasubbu said. It was reinstated in October 2019, but he estimates his company’s business has shrunk by half.

Six executives of parental control app companies interviewed by Reuters said they had a comfortable relationship with Apple until mid-2018. That is when Apple introduced its own, similar software giving parents oversight of their children’s phone screen time and searches.

Apple has said that it had been concerned about parental control apps using technology which gave developers access to sensitive data, and that they declined to approve apps that used the technology if they did not also commit to not sharing data on children.

As the arbiter of who is allowed to sell in the app store, Apple says it has the power to ensure that only the highest quality apps are sold there.

But some developers say it also allows Apple to push out apps that compete with its own products, thus strengthening its profits at a time with its device sales have stagnated and it is seeking new sources of revenue.

Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Chris Sanders and Edward Tobin

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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