Tag Archives: psychology

Researchers say this simple trick could stop the spread of misinformation on social media | Vanderbilt News

[ad_1]

Woman with laptop looks upward, considering her options.
(Getty Images)

The proliferation of false news stories is a big problem in social media, but there may be a very simple remedy, according to a new Vanderbilt University study published in Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review.

headshot of Professor Lisa Fazio
Lisa Fazio (Vanderbilt University)

For most people, clicking “share” happens almost involuntarily, especially when a headline triggers an emotional response or reinforces something they already believe, says Lisa Fazio, an expert on how the brain processes truth and misinformation. She conducted a study to see if asking people to explain why a headline is true or false affected their intention of sharing it on social media.

In the online experiment, 501 participants were presented a series of headlines and some were asked to pause to consider why they believed the headline was true or false before deciding if they would share it. Fazio found that taking this pause significantly reduced the participants’ intention to share false headlines, and did not affect their intention to share the true headlines.

“People may initially be willing to share false information, but with a pause, they are better able to resist that tendency.”
–Lisa Fazio

“Taking that pause likely helped participants consult their prior knowledge and realize that the false headlines were incorrect,” said Fazio, assistant professor of psychology and human development at Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development. “It also may have slowed people down and encouraged them to think more deeply about their actions rather than simply relying on their gut instinct.”

Prior research shows that providing an explanation helps people realize gaps between their perceived knowledge and actual knowledge, and improves learning in classroom settings. Instagram implemented the concept recently when it began prompting users, “Are you sure you want to post this?” when a post contains potentially bullying comments. Fazio believes that a similar prompt could help decrease shares of false information on social media.

“We suggest that social media companies should encourage these pauses to help people to consider the accuracy and quality of what they are posting,” she said. “People may initially be willing to share false information, but with a pause, they are better able to resist that tendency.”

She adds that users can also commit to share content responsibly. “Individuals can implement this on their own by pausing to think about the truth of a story before sharing it with others,” she said.

Read the article “Reducing shares of false news stories: “Pausing to consider why a headline is true or false can help reduce the sharing of false news.”

This research was funded by a gift from Facebook Research.

Follow Fazio on Twitter at @lkfazio.



[ad_2]

Source link

Outlook 2020: Straight from the heart; Bronson Shirley’s life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery | Local News

[ad_1]



Outlook 2020: Straight from the heart; Bronson Shirley's life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery

TANNER MONDOK | HeraldBronson Shirley chews on his fingers while being held by his mom, Kylee Phillips, at the Avalon Country Club at Buhl Park.  

When Kylee Phillips takes her son to Children’s Hospital in Pittsburgh to see his cardiologist or the date of a checkup approaches, she is anxious.

No matter how many times she is told the visit is just routine, or that there is no need to rush back, she still hesitates — and worries.

Her heart beats a little faster and the familiar feelings come back.

Those appointments bring back memories of a day not so long ago when a seemingly routine pediatrician visit ended with her little boy in the hospital — and began a journey she and her husband, Travis Shirley, are still on, even if, now, it is one of hope, blessings and promise.

Bronson Shirley is a bouncy, happy baby.

The 5-month-old squirms to catch the eye of his mom and brightens and giggles when he is face to face with his dad.

He poses and flirts with the camera and anyone else who happens by.

Looking at him, you wouldn’t know that his story is about a rocky start, a chance discovery and a battle no baby should face.

The American Heart Association’s Mercer/Lawrence County Heart Child is OK now, thanks to loving parents and a medical team that fixed his heart.

Kylee and Travis have three children.

Kylee grew up near Buhl Park. Travis is from West Middlesex. Although they live out of town now, they have a lot of family here.

Knowing they would be welcoming another child was a joyous event.

The first two births were uneventful.

Tyson, 5, and Teegan, 3, went right into Kylee’s arms for those first pictures and a kiss from Mom and Dad.

Bronson came into the world a little differently.



Outlook 2020: Staight from the heart; Bronson Shirley's life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery

Kylee Phillips talks about her son, Bronson Shirley, as dad Travis Shirley clutches Bronson’s tiny foot.TANNER MONDOK | Herald

Kylee was scheduled for a caesarian with no indication that it would be anything but routine.

As they waited for their turn to be called back, Travis and Kylee listened to all that was going around them, happy that their own situation was so straight-forward and feeling for the parents who were there for much less joyous reasons.

They weren’t worried at all.

Then their turn came.

And that is when “routine” turned into anything but.

“When you have a C-section, they hold (the baby) up,” Kylee said. “They wrap him up and give him to the father.”

That did not happen with Bronson.

The doctor told Kylee and Travis that their son was having a little trouble breathing.

“They called a Code Blue,” Travis said.

Kylee and Travis could not see what was happening with their son.

“We weren’t allowed to look around the curtain,” Travis said.

He did catch a glimpse, however.

“He was bluish,” Travis said.

Bronson was rushed to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Kylee was still recovering from her own surgical procedure, so she had to wait. Travis, however, got to go down and see their son.

He remembers the tubes, the machines, the concern.



Outlook 2020: Straight from the heart; Bronson Shirley's life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery

TANNER MONDOK | HeraldTravis Shirley shows the tattoo on his arm that he put on social media minutes before his son, Bronson Shirley, was born. It’s his favorite Bible verse, Ezekiel 37:5, “I will make breath enter you, and you will come to life.”

He also remembers celebrating the impending birth of his son on Facebook by quoting his favorite Bible verse, Ezekiel 37:5, “I will make breath enter you, and you will come to life.” He has it tattooed on his arm.

All that seemed frivolous as he sat there hoping his boy was going to be OK.

He wanted to hear him cry, to know he was breathing easily.

“That was all I could think about — how I had put that on Facebook and now my son was having trouble breathing,” he said.

Kylee and Travis took solace in the reassurance from their son’s doctor — “Don’t worry, his heart is strong.”

Soon, Bronson was ready to go home.

He was doing well, a normal happy baby.

And it is was time for a routine one-month checkup.

It was a different pediatrician that day.

She checked him over and listened to his heart.

And that is when she looked at Kylee and said, “I think I hear a heart murmur. Would you want to see a cardiologist?”

Kylee and Travis did and the appointment was set — a quick turnaround.

The pediatrician visit was Wednesday. Bronson got an appointment the following Monday.

“People were surprised we got in so quickly,” Kylee said.

It was just one of the many blessings that are part of their story, she says now.

When the day arrived, Kylee wasn’t worried.

Travis could not be with her, but she expected to be home with good news well before it was time for her other two children to come home from school.

It wasn’t to be.

“I got the worst news of my life,” she said.

Bronson’s echocardiogram took 45 minutes.

“I was there alone,” she said.

She called a friend who came to be with her until Travis could get there.

She also made arrangements to get her children home.

“It was hard to be alone,” she said.

Bronson was admitted right away.



Outlook 2020: Straight from the heart; Bronson Shirley's life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery

TANNER MONDOK | HeraldKylee Phillips wipes away a tear while telling the story of her son, Bronson Shirley. The boy endured heart surgery when he was just a month old.

Kylee credits Dr. Shawn West at Children’s Hospital for getting her and Travis through the tough stuff.

“He made everything seem OK even when it wasn’t,” she said.

Bronson could not go into surgery right away.

Doctors put him on medicine to get him ready to make sure that his body could handle the trauma it was about to go through.

His heart surgery was scheduled for Wednesday.

Kylee and Travis did not want their other children to know how serious the operation was — or that there was a risk that their brother would not make it home.

They told Teegan and Tyson that Bronson was sick and he was in the hospital to get better.

“We had the kids come in because we did not know,” Kylee said, wiping away a tear at the memory. “We just didn’t know.”

The hardest part was the wait. The surgery took about an hour.

“It was really scary,” Kylee said.

The surgery involved clamping off part of Bronson’s aorta, which meant cutting off the flow of blood to part of his body.

But he was a lucky boy. The surgery went well.

“When they brought him back up, he was wrapped up,” Kylee said. “He did not look like he had been through what he had been through.”

And then the recovery began.

Kylee was there most nights, with Travis focusing on making sure Tyson and Teegan were OK and being at the hospital as often as possible.

Bronson was always on his mind.

Kylee and Travis feel blessed.

They got to know the other families in the pediatric cardiac care unit.

They knew their stories were not as happy as Bronson’s.

Some spent months in the hospital with children who were fighting hard, crying often and not thriving the way their little boy was.

The nights were the hardest. As Bronson slept soundly, they heard other babies struggling. It broke Kylee’s heart.

“Sometimes, I would just lay there and cry,” she said.

They felt for the other parents, and always kept their miracle in perspective.

“Emotionally, you are there with your child, but you can’t help but see what is going on around you,” Travis said.

They were the lucky ones, the blessed ones, Kylee and Travis said.

It is something they think about a lot.

“We had the best-case scenario with him,” Kylee said.

It is why they agreed to tell Bronson’s story and to represent the American Heart Association as the 2020 Heart Child family.

“We wanted to say thank you to everyone who supported making the treatments possible that helped Bronson,” Travis said. “We are so grateful for the support for our family and others.”



Outlook 2020: Straight from the heart; Bronson Shirley's life is ahead of him because of lifesaving surgery

TANNER MONDOK | HeraldBronson Shirley sleeps on his mom, Kylee Phillip’s, shoulder at the Avalon Country Club at Buhl Park. 

Bronson’s fight is not over.

Doctors are keeping a close eye on his heart.

He might have to have more surgery later, although he might not.

Kylee isn’t resting easy yet. That’s why the appointments still make her uneasy.

But she knows that her son is strong, happy and thriving. She smiles and hugs him close, grateful and proud. The tears that come now are the remnants of the journey so far — and a glimpse into what will be a bright future. She knows Bronson is special.

He is his daddy’s boy, his brother’s buddy and his sister’s pride and joy.

“We are blessed,” Travis said. “We will never forget that.”



[ad_2]

Source link

Vanderbilt researcher shares more than 3,000 brain scans to support the study of reading and language development | Vanderbilt News

[ad_1]

MRI brain scans (Getty Images)

Vanderbilt University neuroscientist James R. Booth is publicly releasing two large scale neuroimaging datasets on reading and language development to support other researchers across the world who are working to understand how academic skills develop in childhood.

“We have been able to follow our curiosity and answer some really interesting questions with these datasets,” said Booth, the Patricia and Rhodes Hart Professor of Educational Neuroscience at Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development. “My hope is that others will be able to reproduce some of our core findings and extend them in interesting new directions.”

Available in the digital repository OpenNeuro, together the datasets include more than 3,000 magnetic resonance imaging scans that explore brain structure and function in school-age children.

James R. Booth (Vanderbilt)

“My hope is that others will be able to reproduce some of our core findings and extend them in interesting new directions.”
–James R. Booth

Using the data

Booth and his colleagues have used the dataset on “Cross-Sectional Multidomain Lexical Processing,” which uses rhyming, spelling and meaning tasks to understand how children process features of both written and spoken language, to provide a deeper understanding of domain specific and domain general processes in the brain, and how this is related to academic skill.

Through making these data publicly available, other researchers can extend the body of foundational research stemming from this dataset, which includes several tasks in both the visual and auditory modalities. For example, researchers could use  network approaches to understand whether brain dynamics differ depending on task demands.

“Longitudinal Brain Correlates of Multisensory Lexical Processing in Children” expands upon the research conducted in the first dataset, by exploring rhyming in audio-visual contexts (see Figure 1). This project focused on one of the core skills related to reading skill and dyslexia, the ability to map between auditory and visual modalities. This dataset also has a longitudinal component which allows researchers to explore how an individual’s reading develops across childhood.

Figure 1. Overview of study design. Children performed rhyming judgments when in the MRI. The researchers collected structural, functional and diffusion neuroimaging data.

Although several papers have been published on the data, none of these studies have examined changes in brain activation over time, so the release of this data  provides an exciting opportunity for future investigation. Future studies could also examine whether these trajectories can be predicted in advance, which is useful for early identification and intervention.

Comparing brain function to academic skills

In addition to the more than 3,000 brain scans, both datasets include scores from an extensive number of standardized tests to allow researchers to compare brain function to other academically relevant skills. Testing scores, behavioral performance on the imaging tasks, demographics and brain data can be integrated to holistically explore how children develop. For example, it is not known how the neural basis of reading skill varies as a function of cognitive skills indexed by intelligence measures. In addition, it is not known how socio-economic status relates to functional brain changes over time in the reading network.

Publications on the data

Marisa Lytle (Vanderbilt)

“We hope to continue to do our part in giving back to the scientific community and making research practices more open and transparent.”
–Marisa Lytle

Detailed descriptors of these datasets have been recently published in Data in Brief (Multidomain) and Scientific Data (Multisensory) to facilitate future reuse of the data. Both the datasets and their descriptors are open access, meaning that anyone with internet access can read and utilize these extensive datasets.

Booth’s lab has also released additional resources on how to share neuroimaging data.

“We hope to continue to do our part in giving back to the scientific community and making research practices more open and transparent,” said Marisa Lytle, research assistant  in Booth’s Brain Development Lab and coordinator for the data sharing project. “By providing the knowledge of how to share data in addition to the datasets themselves, we hope that other researchers will feel empowered to share their own data with the research community and the public.”

Previous dataset release

In March 2019, Booth released the largest known developmental neuroimaging dataset on arithmetic processing, comprised of several hundred brain scans his lab conducted on school-age children performing math problems. This data is also freely available.

Funding

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the initial research for these two datasets (R01-HD042049) as well as the sharing of the data (R03-HD093547).

Learn More

Watch a video of James R. Booth discussing his research

Visit the website for the Brain Development Lab

[ad_2]

Source link

Vanderbilt researcher shares more than 3,000 brain scans to support the study of reading and language development | Vanderbilt News

[ad_1]

MRI brain scans (Getty Images)

Vanderbilt University neuroscientist James R. Booth is publicly releasing two large scale neuroimaging datasets on reading and language development to support other researchers across the world who are working to understand how academic skills develop in childhood.

“We have been able to follow our curiosity and answer some really interesting questions with these datasets,” said Booth, the Patricia and Rhodes Hart Professor of Educational Neuroscience at Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development. “My hope is that others will be able to reproduce some of our core findings and extend them in interesting new directions.”

Available in the digital repository OpenNeuro, together the datasets include more than 3,000 magnetic resonance imaging scans that explore brain structure and function in school-age children.

James R. Booth (Vanderbilt)

“My hope is that others will be able to reproduce some of our core findings and extend them in interesting new directions.”
–James R. Booth

Using the data

Booth and his colleagues have used the dataset on “Cross-Sectional Multidomain Lexical Processing,” which uses rhyming, spelling and meaning tasks to understand how children process features of both written and spoken language, to provide a deeper understanding of domain specific and domain general processes in the brain, and how this is related to academic skill.

Through making these data publicly available, other researchers can extend the body of foundational research stemming from this dataset, which includes several tasks in both the visual and auditory modalities. For example, researchers could use  network approaches to understand whether brain dynamics differ depending on task demands.

“Longitudinal Brain Correlates of Multisensory Lexical Processing in Children” expands upon the research conducted in the first dataset, by exploring rhyming in audio-visual contexts (see Figure 1). This project focused on one of the core skills related to reading skill and dyslexia, the ability to map between auditory and visual modalities. This dataset also has a longitudinal component which allows researchers to explore how an individual’s reading develops across childhood.

Figure 1. Overview of study design. Children performed rhyming judgments when in the MRI. The researchers collected structural, functional and diffusion neuroimaging data.

Although several papers have been published on the data, none of these studies have examined changes in brain activation over time, so the release of this data  provides an exciting opportunity for future investigation. Future studies could also examine whether these trajectories can be predicted in advance, which is useful for early identification and intervention.

Comparing brain function to academic skills

In addition to the more than 3,000 brain scans, both datasets include scores from an extensive number of standardized tests to allow researchers to compare brain function to other academically relevant skills. Testing scores, behavioral performance on the imaging tasks, demographics and brain data can be integrated to holistically explore how children develop. For example, it is not known how the neural basis of reading skill varies as a function of cognitive skills indexed by intelligence measures. In addition, it is not known how socio-economic status relates to functional brain changes over time in the reading network.

Publications on the data

Marisa Lytle (Vanderbilt)

“We hope to continue to do our part in giving back to the scientific community and making research practices more open and transparent.”
–Marisa Lytle

Detailed descriptors of these datasets have been recently published in Data in Brief (Multidomain) and Scientific Data (Multisensory) to facilitate future reuse of the data. Both the datasets and their descriptors are open access, meaning that anyone with internet access can read and utilize these extensive datasets.

Booth’s lab has also released additional resources on how to share neuroimaging data.

“We hope to continue to do our part in giving back to the scientific community and making research practices more open and transparent,” said Marisa Lytle, research assistant  in Booth’s Brain Development Lab and coordinator for the data sharing project. “By providing the knowledge of how to share data in addition to the datasets themselves, we hope that other researchers will feel empowered to share their own data with the research community and the public.”

Previous dataset release

In March 2019, Booth released the largest known developmental neuroimaging dataset on arithmetic processing, comprised of several hundred brain scans his lab conducted on school-age children performing math problems. This data is also freely available.

Funding

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the initial research for these two datasets (R01-HD042049) as well as the sharing of the data (R03-HD093547).

Learn More

Watch a video of James R. Booth discussing his research

Visit the website for the Brain Development Lab

[ad_2]

Source link

Scholar-athlete: Kaylann Boyd | Vanderbilt Information

[ad_1]

Video by Zack Eagles

Story by Chad Bishop

Vanderbilt senior Kaylann Boyd has by no means been one to again down from a problem.

And to be fairly trustworthy, she considers herself grateful for these challenges which have all the time been positioned in entrance of her.

“It’s laborious. I imply, it truly is,” Boyd stated about life as a Vanderbilt student-athlete. “It’s numerous laborious work, numerous late nights of finding out and numerous occasions the place you’re like, ‘God, my physique is barely going to get by this follow.’ However, once more, it’s your mentality of the way you’re going to assault the day and the way are you going to let it assault you?

“It additionally helps with our teammates being on the identical web page as one another. You understand that they’re going by the very same factor. If they will get by it, I can get by it and we are able to get by this collectively. Nevertheless it’s not even getting by it, it’s what can I do to get higher? With that mentality going into soccer, with that mentality going into lecturers, it’s a lot extra helpful to you as a person.”

A senior ahead for the Commodores, Boyd has developed into one of many SEC’s high gamers all through her profession. However a collegiate path that included Vanderbilt appeared unlikely throughout childhood.

Kaylann Boyd on the pitch

Boyd’s household and educators discovered that the promising athlete had dyslexia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity dysfunction.

“I wouldn’t say it’s laborious, I simply say it’s completely different. I’ve to take regardless of the materials the instructor offers me and I’ve to take that and be taught it for myself,” she stated. “Generally I can go 1-on-1 with the instructor and be higher so it’s simply sort of as much as me. If I’m struggling in a category I’ll positively go to the instructor’s assistant or the instructor and sort of say, ‘Hey, I’m going to wish to enter workplace hours as a result of I’m struggling.’

“They’ve been greater than useful in the case of speaking that. That’s on me to guage whether or not or not this class goes to be a battle or on this class I’m going to be alright.”

An perspective of acceptance mixed with a dedication to beat has allowed Boyd to flourish – not solely on the sphere, however off of it.

Boyd began 21 video games as a junior and scored eight occasions. She’s performed in 10 matches this season and began 4 of these because the Commodores make one other late push towards the postseason.

Within the classroom the psychology main – with an emphasis in youngster research – has turned her studying incapacity right into a ardour for serving to others.

Kaylann Boyd in class“I simply have a giant coronary heart for teenagers,” she stated, “particularly as a result of I believe I do have that keenness for by no means wanting some child to suppose they’re dumb or that they don’t slot in into a college system or wherever they’re.”

Boyd remembers her early childhood being a battle when it got here to lecturers. She admits that numerous the occasions she masked and hid her incapacity to learn and comprehend even the only of duties.

She felt dumb and completely different and performed faux in hopes that nobody would discover her struggles. Lecturers and household did discover, nonetheless, and shortly Boyd was attending a speech faculty. After in depth testing she got here to phrases with what she needed to do.

“I believe as soon as I accepted, OK, I actually do must get my fingers soiled, learn to learn, hearken to what these individuals are telling me, I simply sort of jumped proper in,” she stated. “I took the whole lot in that anybody was expressing to me and I additionally was simply a type of children that was simply continually asking questions desirous to know extra – which I don’t suppose most children are.

“Fortunately my mother sort of floor that into me. ‘If you happen to don’t perceive one thing, ask.’ I used to be very open, asking questions, desirous to know extra data on how you can do sure issues or other ways to do sure issues. Then simply sitting again and evaluating. Say I didn’t do properly on this take a look at and I studied a sure means, possibly I shouldn’t assault it that means the subsequent time.”

A graduate of the Better Atlanta Christian College, Boyd enrolled at Vanderbilt in 2016 and performed in each match that season for head coach Darren Ambrose. She’s been part of a senior class that has gained 48 video games and counting.

Ambrose stated Boyd’s development has been in direct correlation with being positioned in uncomfortable conditions on the pitch and on West Finish.

Kaylann Boyd with teammates“I’ve had some very private and personal conversations together with her as she was going by numerous challenges,” Ambrose stated. “The reward has been seeing her give again and spend money on an space that I do know she feels that she will have an effect on, an space wherein she struggled herself, I believe is de facto sort of cool. And it says the whole lot about her.

“She desires to present again, she desires to work with children. I believe she has the proper character to try this. She’s a really giving particular person in so some ways and has a really type character. I believe that’s what it’s going to take for her to have the influence that she desires in that area.”

Boyd stated throughout the previous 4 years she has discovered her calling in wanting to assist others who’ve might gone by the identical struggles she has. She cited Ann Neely’s studying literature class as a significant affect in addition to programs in developmental psychology, adolescent growth and ladies’s and gender research.

She additionally recollects throughout her years as a tutor working with a baby who confirmed indicators of being autistic and explaining to the mother and father their youngster was merely completely different than others – identical to Boyd is completely different.

“I’ve all the time sort of caught with the identical factor, which is simply, ‘there’s nothing flawed with you in any way,’ and ensuring that they perceive that. They’re simply completely different. There may be nothing flawed with them,” Boyd stated. “My mother stated that to me rising up as a result of she by no means needed me to really feel within the flawed or that I used to be dumb or that I couldn’t learn.

“ ‘No, you’re completely different, you’re particular and there’s nothing flawed with that. You’re distinctive. You’re you.’ ”

Extra Scholar-Athlete Tales

[ad_2]

Supply hyperlink

Medical execs kind bonds via excessive and lows of treating childhood most cancers | Bellevue Chief

[ad_1]

How do you do it? How do you undergo the highs and lows?

Rebecca Swanson will get requested questions like that so much. She is a pediatric nurse practitioner at Nebraska Medication, the place she’s labored within the pediatric oncology unit for the previous seven years. It’s a occupation that brings her into shut and frequent contact with households when they’re at their most susceptible.

“You basically know all the things about these youngsters and their households since you’re with them an unimaginable period of time,” she stated.

September is Childhood Most cancers Consciousness Month. In line with the Youngsters’s Most cancers Analysis Fund, greater than 15,000 kids are recognized with most cancers every year, and greater than 2,000 beneath the age of 18 die.

Nurses like Swanson, and comparable roles like little one life specialists, who educate kids and their households concerning the therapy they are going to obtain and attempt to assist decrease stress and nervousness, are on the entrance traces of that wrestle with households.

Swanson began as a flooring nurse in 2007 when Nebraska Medication had a mixed grownup/pediatric oncology unit, and as she’s grown professionally, pediatrics drew her in as a result of she loved forming relationships with kids and admired their pure resiliency.

“Lots of occasions they don’t perceive and even comprehend what they’re up towards they usually know they’ve most cancers they usually know what they must do they usually simply do it, and there’s some magnificence in that,” she stated.

Despite the fact that they might not absolutely perceive what they’re up towards, it’s essential for youngsters to be acquainted with the therapy they obtain, and that’s the place little one life specialists like Debbie Wagers are available.

CLPs have backgrounds in childhood growth, Wagers stated, and increase that data with particular medical coursework to familiarize themselves with the medical setting. She educates the kid utilizing play-based, age-appropriate educating strategies to assist them perceive why the medical doctors are having them bear tough remedies.

Additionally they present play alternatives to assist remind them they’re nonetheless youngsters despite the fact that they face a tough state of affairs.

“It offers them a spot to have the ability to specific and address issues,” Wagers stated. “It’s a distraction for them as a result of they’re having issues accomplished to them which are disagreeable.”

Discomfort and stress and never confined to the hospital. A baby might miss lengthy stretches of college and really feel disconnected from buddies and classmates.

Wagers additionally goes to school rooms and teaches a affected person’s classmates about issues like what most cancers is, why their pal appears otherwise or has totally different guidelines than the remainder of the scholars — why they’ll put on a hat or have a snack in school, for instance.

Mother and father, Wagers and Swanson stated, current a number of the greatest challenges. The dad and mom need to defend their kids and repair their issues, however most cancers doesn’t enable them to try this.

They typically must journey, miss work or give up work completely, which might result in monetary stress, and life at house is modified as a result of their little one might have a compromised immune system due to their most cancers therapy.

“We need to repair all the things and defend our kids and you may’t defend them from this,” Wagers stated. “They’re having issues accomplished which are scary, generally they’re painful and also you simply need to repair it and there isn’t something you are able to do so that you simply have that overwhelming feeling of helplessness.”

Emotional and private connections are shaped over the course of a affected person’s therapy. Swanson sees about 50 kids a 12 months, she stated, and going via the highs and lows will be tough however price it.

Every nurse and CLP decides what’s an acceptable degree of attachment based mostly on what they really feel they’ll deal with emotionally and what the affected person wants, however Wagers and Swanson stated it was essential to kind bonds.

“If I’m not loving these youngsters like they’re my very own and treating them like they had been relations then I don’t assume that I’m doing my job,” Wagers stated.

Swanson known as it “the artwork of caring.”

“You may’t really look after a affected person holistically, their complete being, with out forming a few of these connections,” she stated.

Resulting from developments is analysis and therapy, little one sufferers recognized with some forms of most cancers have survival charges as excessive as 90%, in line with St. Baldrick’s Basis.

So despite the fact that there are lows and never each affected person survives, Swanson stated it is very important rejoice birthdays and different milestones.

“We by far have extra comfortable days than we’ve got unhappy days,” Swanson stated.

Even so, each famous that childhood most cancers is underfunded and under-researched. Older persons are recognized with most cancers extra regularly than youthful individuals, and the funding and analysis emphasis mirror that.

However Wagers argued that the quantity of life misplaced if, say, a 65-year-old is recognized and dies could also be a handful of years, however a childhood most cancers affected person may lose a long time.

“We’ve got to do a greater job,” she stated.



[ad_2]

Supply hyperlink

 $3.2M grant to fund Vanderbilt study of reading skills in children who are deaf or hard of hearing | Vanderbilt News

[ad_1]

Boy signing the word 'Book' in American Sign Language while studying with his parents
(Getty Images)

Vanderbilt University has been awarded a $3.2 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to better understand how children who are deaf or hard of hearing excel at reading. Millions of children are hearing impaired and these individuals tend to have below-average reading skills. Only about 10 percent of DHH individuals attain age-appropriate reading levels by high school graduation.

James R. Booth (Vanderbilt)
James R. Booth (Vanderbilt)

“Deafness per se is not the cause of low reading skill,”said principal investigator James R. Booth. “If we understand how reading works in children who are deaf and hard of hearing, then we are better positioned to help them in learning to read. Existing models of reading do not adequately account for children who are deaf and hard of hearing, so this project will result in the first comprehensive brain-based model of the reading process in these individuals.”

Booth, who holds the Patricia and Rodes Hart Chair of Educational Neuroscience at Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development, leads the five-year multi-institutional study.  He will use functional magnetic resonance imaging in children ages 10 to 15 to identify the brain mechanisms important for skilled reading. He will use “localizer” tasks to independently identify brain regions involved in signed language, speech reading, vocabulary knowledge and phonology (awareness of the sound structure of language).

Also on the project are Angela Scruggs, a certified American Sign Language interpreter, who brings her expertise in counseling of the deaf and hard of hearing, and Chris Brozdowski, a scholar and expert in sign language linguistics.

“Existing models of reading do not adequately account for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.”
–James R. Booth

The team will examine how brain regions are engaged in order to provide a deeper understanding of how some DHH children attain high levels of reading skill. The team is particularly interested in how these regions are differently used in higher skill children who predominantly use signed language versus oral language.

“This work will have direct implications for improving literacy education for children who are deaf or hard of hearing,” Booth said.

The study will follow-up with the children two years later. “One of the most exciting aspects of the work is to use brain function at the first time point to predict gains in reading over time,” Booth said. “Using brain scans to determine who is likely to struggle with reading in the future will allow more effective early identification, so that we provide children who are deaf or hard of hearing with additional instructional support.”

A team of researchers from around the United States serve on the advisory panel for this project (see below). They will travel to Vanderbilt to discuss their own work and consult on the project. The team has also established extensive connections with organizations that serve DHH individuals (see figure).

Map shows the approximate location of committed sites (blue stars), supportive sites (green stars), and interested sites (orange stars). Numbers indicate organizations within that geographical area. Click on image to enlarge.

How to be a participant in the study

The study will involve participants from Tennessee, but the team also will be recruiting participants from across the United States. If selected, the participant’s expenses will be paid,  including travel and accommodation. Only children without cochlear implants can participate, as this project uses fMRI. To apply, email braindevelopmentlaboratory@gmail.com.

Investigators

Consultants

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health grant #R01 DC018171

Learn more

[ad_2]

Source link

Toddler brains resist studying from screens, even video chat | Vanderbilt Information

[ad_1]

Little ones could also be fascinated by the cartoon character or individual on TV asking them questions and pausing for a response. However science reveals that kids beneath the age of 30 months don’t are likely to study from such encounters.

In contrast to older kids, infants and toddlers want responsive, face-to-face encounters with actual, dwell people so as to study new info. However what about video chat? Can infants and toddlers study from an individual on a display screen who, in contrast to a TV present or app, can name them by title and work together with them in actual time?

Troseth (Vanderblt)

Vanderbilt College researcher Georgene Troseth made that query the main target of her newest examine. Troseth is an affiliate professor of psychology at Vanderbilt Peabody Faculty of training and human improvement, and a frontrunner within the discipline of early childhood improvement.

Video chat is enjoyable, however is it an efficient educating software?

For this examine, Troseth and her group studied 176 toddlers in two age teams (24 months and 30 months) to see beneath which situations they might greatest study the title of a novel object. The youngsters within the examine didn’t have prior expertise with video chat.

The researchers chosen a humorous formed object that they selected to call a “modi.” The toddlers have been charged with studying the title of the item and placing it in a bin.

They have been studied beneath these 4 situations:

  • Responsive dwell: the individual making the request was current and engaged with the kid;
  • Unresponsive video: the speaker on the display screen seemed on the digital camera and smiled at scripted instances;
  • Unresponsive dwell: though current, the speaker behaved as she did on the unresponsive video; and
  • Responsive video: a speaker on closed-circuit video engaged with the kid, simply as they could on video chat.

In contrast to older kids, infants and toddlers want responsive, face-to-face encounters with actual, dwell people so as to study new info.

The researchers discovered that the toddlers in each age teams reliably discovered the toy’s title within the responsive dwell situation, and older toddlers discovered within the unresponsive dwell situation.

However neither group discovered in both of the video situations.

Troseth says that’s as a result of to toddlers, a flat picture of an individual on a display screen isn’t “actual,” so their brains inform them what they’re seeing isn’t personally related and never one thing they’ll study from.

Regardless that video chat consists of extra communicative social cues and interplay than a nonresponsive video, the medium nonetheless was not enough to help studying within the examine.

How do toddlers study greatest?

One of the simplest ways for infants and toddlers to study, says Troseth, is thru optimistic interactions with an grownup, whether or not taking part in a board sport, studying a ebook or having display screen time. When adults use dialogic questioning — asking the kid questions and welcoming them to interject their very own ideas, emotions and concepts — that’s when studying is almost definitely to occur, she has discovered.

The outcomes of the examine weren’t shocking to the researchers. These findings help Troseth’s previous analysis inspecting the influence of youngsters’s movies and tv reveals on toddler studying.

Video chat is participating and enjoyable, however preschoolers battle with making the leap from actual life to what they’re seeing on the display screen. This begins to alter round age 4. (Getty Photos)

Regardless of these outcomes, Troseth emphasizes that video chat might maintain some promise for educating toddlers.

“Video chat is exclusive in that it permits kids and the on-screen grownup to coordinate their consideration to share focus and work together in actual time,” she says. “So, it’s attainable that toddlers might study to reply to and study from video chat over time — however provided that they’ve an grownup current to help that studying.”

Extra concerning the analysis

  • This analysis was supported by NICHD Grant R03-HD044751-01 to the primary creator, Georgene Troseth, and a graduate traineeship from the Institute of Training Sciences, U.S. Division of Training, by grant R305B040110 to Vanderbilt College.
  • Further assets have been offered by an NICHD grant to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Heart (P30 HD-15052) and NCRR/NIH grant 1 UL1 RR024975. Delivery knowledge have been offered by the Tennessee Division of Well being, Division of Coverage, Planning and Evaluation, Workplace of Important Data.
  • Learn the paper, “Let’s Chat: On-Display screen Social Responsiveness Is Not Ample to Help Toddlers’ Phrase Studying From Video,” in Developmental Psychology.
  • Further authors: Gabrielle A. Strouse, Division of Counseling and Psychology in Training, College of South Dakota; Brian N. Verdine, College of Training, College of Delaware, Newark; and Megan M. Saylor, Vanderbilt College.

[ad_2]

Supply hyperlink

the secret frequency for lottery winning MegaMillions binaural beats for money and luck ASMR



New Manifesting Lottery Jackpot fast play list

New! Hypnosis for winning the lottery now!
http://www.hypnotherapy.org/videohypnosiswinningthelottery2.html

New! Check out our Manifest Money playlist!

New! Powerball edition

More lottery winning video with hypnosis and binaural beats
Hypnosis for Lottery winning with Hypnotist Bernie

Hypnosis for Lottery winning with Melanie

Hypnosis for Lottery winning with Beth

Paranormal Hypnosis demonstration – Automatic writing to predict lottery numbers

Hypnosis for wealth and abundance with Melissa King

Hypnosis to attract wealth and abundance with Hypnotist Bernie on Live TV

Hypnosis to attract good luck

the secret frequency for lottery manifestation – Mega million edition – Money, wealth and abundance brainwave, Wishes fulfilled! ASMR This frequency literally have you vibrating with the same frequency with mother earth. The Schumann resonances (SR) are a set of spectrum peaks in the extremely low frequency (ELF) portion of the Earth’s electromagnetic field spectrum. Schumann resonances are global electromagnetic resonances, excited by lightning discharges in the cavity formed by the Earth’s surface and the ionosphere. In 1952, the German scientist W.O.Schumann discovered a natural pulse resonating around our planet, beating at a frequency of 7.83 Hz (thereafter called the Schumann Resonance). Research has proved that electro-magnetic pollution can inhibit the human body’s ability to synchronise with the Earth’s natural magnetic pulse, thereby throtteling Melatonin, a major cancer suppressant and cell-rejuvenating neuro- hormone produced in the brain. The practice of Earth Breathing can triple the size of our bio-electric field, in other words it will increase natural energy and stimulate the release of endorphins and Melatonin.

Brainwave Frequency, Binaural Beats Playlist

you can find the original here.
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=jKY6WXZtzPU

binaural beats
You too can learn hypnosis!

found out more at
http://www.hypnotherapy.org

More Random Female Hypnotists

Hypnotist Beth Hammond

Hypnotist Chelsea

Hypnotist Zadya

Hypnotist Monica

Hypnotist Allie

http://www.hypnotherapy.org

Please subscribe to our channel, give us a thumbs up and comment below and tell us how much you love our video! : )

hypnotherapy college education university

keyword: hypnosis hipnosis hipnotizador
Blog
3 Girls Hypnotized
http://3girlshypnotized.blogspot.com/?view=sidebar

Food and Travel
http://sushibostonnyc.blogspot.com/

youtube play list
Hypnotherapy Session

Hypnotist Bernie’s Exposition

How to Hypnotize girls

Lady in trance

Bloopers : )

Our other websites
Female Stage Hypnotist
http://www.femalestagehypnotist.com
http://www.carainstitute.com
Food Blog
http://sushibostonnyc.blogspot.com/

hipnosis hipnotizador
催眠术
催眠術師
최면의
ύπνωση
гипноз
hipnoza
ipnosi
hipnoz
гіпноз
היפּנאָסיס
היפנוזה
نوم مغناطيسي
hypnoosi
hypnose

Mega Millions (which began as The Big Game in 1996, with the name modified to The Big Game Mega Millions six years later) is an American multi-jurisdictional lottery game; it is offered in 44 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The first (The Big Game) Mega Millions drawing was in 2002 (see below.)

The minimum Mega Millions advertised jackpot is $15 million, paid in 30 graduated yearly installments, increasing 5% each year (unless the cash option is chosen; see below for differences by lottery.) The jackpot increases when there is no top-prize winner[1] (see below for information on how the game’s jackpot is funded.)

source