Tag Archives: plants

Bougainvillea is a genus of thorny decorative vines, bushes, or

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Bougainvillea is a genus of thorny decorative vines, bushes, or bushes. It’s native to South Japanese America, from Brazil, west to Peru, and south to southern Argentina. Completely different authors have mentioned that there are round 18 species within the genus. The inflorescence consists of enormous vibrant sepal-like bracts which surrounds the three easy waxy flowers.
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Surprisingly many people do not know origins of the floral variety round us as flora is essentially the most taken as a right facet of nature. One such species is that this. From mosses to very large bushes, there is a huge variety amongst them and every considered one of them has a particular job to carry out in sustaining nature’s stability and it is respective meals chains.
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#flora #mosses #bushes #vegetation #inflorescence #flowers #inexperienced #shrubs #herbs #ornaments #vines #bushes #bougenvillea #nature #foodchain #stability #wildlife #wildlifephotos #wildlifeindia #wildlifeofindia #india #pune #puneig #instagram #instagramers #instagrammer

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Joshua Tree Nationwide Park braces for crowds amid holidays

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Joshua Tree Nationwide Park is gearing up for the massive crowds drawn to the Southern California desert in the course of the holidays

JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. —
Joshua Tree Nationwide Park is gearing up for the massive crowds drawn to the Southern California desert in the course of the holidays.

The Nationwide Park Service says the interval from late December via Jan. 1 brings a few of the busiest days, and campgrounds and parking tons will seemingly be full.

At occasions, the park turns into drive-through-only as a result of there are not any extra parking areas.

Guests are suggested to keep away from driving in between 10 a.m. and a couple of p.m. as a result of entrance station traces are at their peak throughout these hours.

The park says utilizing the Twentynine Palms entrance is a solution to keep away from the road on the entrance close to the city of Joshua Tree.

Current years have seen an enormous enhance in annual attendance at Joshua Tree Nationwide Park, which straddles the Mojave and Colorado deserts 140 miles (225 kilometers) east of Los Angeles.

An identical various vacation spot is the Mojave Nationwide Protect, which lies to the north.

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Yellow cedar rejected for threatened species itemizing

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An iconic Alaska tree with roots that may freeze to dying if not lined by snow was rejected Friday by a federal company for the threatened species checklist.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mentioned that yellow cedar doesn’t warrant extra protections as a result of timber will persist in areas the place local weather change doesn’t have an effect on the timber.

Warming impacts timber in lower than 6 p.c of yellow cedar vary that stretches alongside the Pacific Coast from northern California to Alaska’s Panhandle, in response to the company.

“Regardless of impacts from results of local weather change, timber harvest, hearth, and different stressors, the species is predicted to persist in hundreds of stands throughout its vary, in quite a lot of ecological niches, with no predicted lower in total genetic range into the foreseeable future,” the company mentioned in its dedication.

A spokeswoman for the Middle for Organic Variety, one of many teams that petitioned for the yellow cedar itemizing, referred to as the choice reckless and a blow to the Tongass Nationwide Forest, the nation’s largest.

“Alaska’s yellow cedar are struggling a double-whammy from the local weather disaster and intensifying logging of their stronghold on the Tongass,” mentioned Shaye Wolf in an e mail response to questions. “As a substitute of defending these historical timber, the Trump administration is fueling the important thing threats to the species with its reckless local weather denial and logging assault on the Tongass.”

A analysis overview achieved for the Alaska Division of Fish and Sport indicated that 12 p.c of yellow cedar vary in Alaska is affected with 70% to 80% cedar mortality in these areas, she mentioned. Die-offs are projected to worsen, she mentioned.

“If pressing motion shouldn’t be taken to reign in carbon air pollution, by 2070 yellow cedars might now not be capable of survive in half the areas of their vary which might be presently climatically appropriate, with 75 p.c of yellow cedar forests in Alaska experiencing unsuitable situations,” she mentioned.

Yellow cedar timber can reside greater than 1,000 years and are a key a part of southeast Alaska Native tradition.

Native Alaska Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian folks use the rot-resistant wooden for canoe paddles and totem poles. They take lengthwise strips of bark from dwelling timber for weaving baskets and hats, and as backing in blankets. The timber can get better after the bark strip is eliminated and proceed rising.

The itemizing petition, filed in June 2104, mentioned that throughout 781 sq. miles (2023 sq. kilometers) of Alaska’s Panhandle, greater than 70 p.c of yellow cedar timber had died due to root freeze induced by local weather change.

Yellow cedar was amongst a dozen species rejected for itemizing by the company. The company additionally rejected the Berry Cave salamander, cobblestone tiger beetle, Florida clamshell orchid, longhead darter, Ocala vetch, Panamint alligator lizard, Peaks of Otter salamander, redlips darter, Scott riffle beetle, southern hognose snake and yellow anise tree.

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Vous aussi, le décor industriel et végétal du restaurant new-yorkais @cafe_colet…

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Vous aussi, le décor industriel et végétal du restaurant new-yorkais @cafe_colette vous encourage ? 🌿 Que vous soyez archi, décorateur, gérant d’une entreprise, d’un hôtel ou d’un restaurant, n’hésitez pas à contacter notre professionnelle Grace sur professional@selency.com pour lui parler de votre projet déco, elle sera ravie de vous aider. 👌 | Tropical temper in @cafe_colette. 🌿
📸 @mbkimchi
📍 Café Colette, New York
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#restaurant #decor #vegetal #inexperienced #vegetation #espresso NYC #projet #uncover #interiordesign #verriere #classic #chairs #deco #ornament #secondemain #vintagefurniture #restaurantdecor #industrial #chiner #environment #eat #restau #decolovers #tropicalmood

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Shock rescue of Jamaica coral reefs exhibits nature can heal

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Everton Simpson squints on the Caribbean from his motorboat, scanning the dazzling bands of shade for hints of what lies beneath. Emerald inexperienced signifies sandy bottoms. Sapphire blue lies above seagrass meadows. And deep indigo marks coral reefs. That is the place he is headed.

He steers the boat to an unmarked spot that he is aware of because the “coral nursery.” ”It is like a forest beneath the ocean,” he says, strapping on blue flippers and fastening his oxygen tank earlier than tipping backward into the azure waters. He swims straight down 25 toes carrying a pair of steel shears, fishing line and a plastic crate.

On the ocean ground, small coral fragments dangle from suspended ropes, like socks held on a laundry line. Simpson and different divers are likely to this underwater nursery as gardeners thoughts a flower mattress — slowly and painstakingly plucking off snails and fireworms that feast on immature coral.

When every stub grows to concerning the measurement of a human hand, Simpson collects them in his crate to individually “transplant” onto a reef, a course of akin to planting every blade of grass in a garden individually.

Even fast-growing coral species add only a few inches a 12 months. And it isn’t attainable to easily scatter seeds.

A couple of hours later, at a website known as Dickie’s Reef, Simpson dives once more and makes use of bits of fishing line to tie clusters of staghorn coral onto rocky outcroppings — a short lived binding till the coral’s limestone skeleton grows and fixes itself onto the rock. The purpose is to jumpstart the pure progress of a coral reef. And up to now, it is working.

Nearly everybody in Jamaica is dependent upon the ocean, together with Simpson, who lives in a modest home he constructed himself close to the island’s northern coast. The energetic 68-year-old has reinvented himself a number of occasions, however at all times made a residing from the ocean.

As soon as a spear fisherman and later a scuba-diving teacher, Simpson began working as a “coral gardener” two years in the past — a part of grassroots efforts to deliver Jamaica’s coral reefs again from the brink.

Coral reefs are sometimes known as “rainforests of the ocean” for the astonishing range of life they shelter.

Simply 2 p.c of the ocean ground is crammed with coral, however the branching constructions — formed like every little thing from reindeer antlers to human brains — maintain 1 / 4 of all marine species. Clown fish, parrotfish, groupers and snappers lay eggs and conceal from predators within the reef’s nooks and crannies, and their presence attracts eels, sea snakes, octopuses and even sharks. In wholesome reefs, jellyfish and sea turtles are common guests.

With fish and coral, it is a codependent relationship — the fish rely on the reef construction to evade hazard and lay eggs, and so they additionally eat up the coral’s rivals.

Life on the ocean ground is sort of a slow-motion competitors for area, or an underwater recreation of musical chairs. Tropical fish and different marine animals, like black sea urchins, munch on fast-growing algae and seaweed that will in any other case outcompete the slow-growing coral for area. When too many fish disappear, the coral suffers — and vice-versa.

After a collection of pure and man-made disasters within the 1980s and 1990s, Jamaica misplaced 85 p.c of its once-bountiful coral reefs. In the meantime, fish catches declined to a sixth of what that they had been within the 1950s, pushing households that depend upon seafood nearer to poverty. Many scientists thought that the majority of Jamaica’s coral reef had been completely changed by seaweed, like jungle overtaking a ruined cathedral.

However in the present day, the corals and tropical fish are slowly reappearing, thanks partially to a collection of cautious interventions.

The fragile labor of the coral gardener is just one a part of restoring a reef — and for all its intricacy, it is really probably the most easy half. Convincing lifelong fishermen to curtail when and the place they fish and controlling the surging waste dumped into the ocean are trickier endeavors.

Nonetheless, slowly, the comeback effort is gaining momentum.

“The coral are coming again; the fish are coming again,” says Stuart Sandin, a marine biologist on the Scripps Establishment of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. “It is most likely a few of the most vibrant coral reefs we have seen in Jamaica because the 1970s.”

“Once you give nature an opportunity, she will restore herself,” he provides. “It isn’t too late.”

Sandin is learning the well being of coral reefs around the globe as a part of a analysis mission known as the “100 Island Problem.” His beginning assumption was that probably the most populated islands would have probably the most degraded habitats, however what he discovered as a substitute is that people may be both a blessing or a curse, relying on how they handle sources.

In Jamaica, greater than a dozen grassroots-run coral nurseries and fish sanctuaries have sprung up previously decade, supported by small grants from foundations, native companies reminiscent of lodges and scuba clinics, and the Jamaican authorities.

At White River Fish Sanctuary, which is barely about 2 years previous and the place Simpson works, the clearest proof of early success is the return of tropical fish that inhabit the reefs — in addition to hungry pelicans, skimming the floor of the water to feed on them.

Jamaica’s coral reefs had been as soon as among the many world’s most celebrated, with their golden branching constructions and resident bright-colored fish drawing the eye of vacationers from Christopher Columbus to Ian Fleming, who wrote most of his James Bond novels on the island nation’s northern coast within the 1950s and ’60s.

In 1965, the nation turned the location of the primary international analysis hub for coral reefs, the Discovery Bay Marine Lab, now related to the College of the West Indies. The pathbreaking marine biologist couple Thomas and Nora Goreau accomplished basic analysis right here, together with describing the symbiotic relationship between coral and algae and pioneering the usage of scuba gear for marine research.

The identical lab additionally offered a vantage level because the coral disappeared.

Peter Gayle has been a marine biologist at Discovery Bay since 1985. From the yard exterior his workplace, he factors towards the reef crest about 300 meters away — a skinny brown line splashed with white waves. “Earlier than 1980, Jamaica had wholesome coral,” he notes. Then a number of disasters struck.

The primary calamity was 1980’s Hurricane Allen, some of the highly effective cyclones in recorded historical past. “Its 40-foot waves crashed in opposition to the shore and mainly chewed up the reef,” Gayle says. Coral can develop again after pure disasters, however solely when given an opportunity to get well — which it by no means received.

That very same decade, a mysterious epidemic killed greater than 95% of the black sea urchins within the Caribbean, whereas overfishing ravaged fish populations. And surging waste from the island’s rising human inhabitants, which almost doubled between 1960 and 2010, launched chemical compounds and vitamins into the water that spur quicker algae progress. The consequence: Seaweed and algae took over.

“There was a tipping level within the 1980s, when it switched from being a coral-dominated system to being an algae-dominated system,” Gayle says. “Scientists name it a ‘part shift.'”

That appeared like the top of the story, till an unlikely alliance began to tip the ecosystem again within the different path — with assist from residents like Everton Simpson and his fellow fisherman Lipton Bailey.

The fishing group of White River revolves round a small boat-docking space a few quarter-mile from the place the river flows into the Caribbean Sea. One early morning, as purple daybreak mild filters into the sky, Simpson and Bailey step onto a 28-foot motorboat known as the Interceptor.

Each males have lived and fished their complete lives in the neighborhood. Just lately, they’ve come to imagine that they should defend the coral reefs that entice tropical fish, whereas setting limits on fishing to make sure the ocean is not emptied too shortly.

Within the White River space, the answer was to create a protected space — a “fish sanctuary” — for immature fish to develop and attain reproductive age earlier than they’re caught.

Two years in the past, the fishermen joined with native companies, together with resort homeowners, to kind a marine affiliation and negotiate the boundaries for a no-fishing zone stretching two miles alongside the coast. A easy line within the water is hardly a deterrent, nevertheless — to make the boundary significant, it have to be enforced. At present, the native fishermen, together with Simpson and Bailey, take turns patrolling the boundary within the Interceptor.

On this morning, the boys steer the boat simply exterior a row of orange buoys marked “No Fishing.” ”We’re searching for violators,” Bailey says, his eyes skilled on the rocky coast. “Generally you discover spearmen. They assume they’re good. We attempt to beat them at their recreation.”

Many of the older and extra established fishermen, who personal boats and set out strains and wire cages, have come to simply accept the no-fishing zone. In addition to, the chance of getting their gear confiscated is simply too nice. However not everyone seems to be on board. Some youthful males hunt with light-weight spearguns, swimming out to sea and firing at close-range. These males — a few of them poor and with few choices — are the most definitely trespassers.

The patrols carry no weapons, so they have to grasp the artwork of persuasion. “Allow them to perceive this — it isn’t a you factor or a me factor. This is not private,” Bailey says of previous encounters with violators.

These are generally dangerous efforts. Two years in the past, Jerlene Layne, a supervisor at close by Boscobel Fish Sanctuary, landed within the hospital with a bruised leg after being attacked by a person she had reprimanded for fishing illegally within the sanctuary. “He used a persist with hit my leg as a result of I used to be doing my job — telling him he can not fish within the protected space,” she says.

Layne believes her work could be safer with extra formal assist from the police, however she is not going to cease.

“Public mindsets can change,” she says. “If I again down on this, what sort of message does that ship? It’s important to stand for one thing.”

She has pressed costs in court docket in opposition to repeat trespassers, usually leading to a effective and gear confiscation.

One such violator is Damian Brown, 33, who lives in a coastal neighborhood known as Stewart City. Sitting exterior on a concrete staircase close to his modest residence, Brown says fishing is his solely possibility for work — and he believes the sanctuary boundaries lengthen too far.

However others who as soon as had been skeptical say they’ve come to see limits as an excellent factor.

Again on the White River docking space, Rick Walker, a 35-year-old spearfisherman, is cleansing his motorboat. He remembers the early opposition to the fish sanctuary, with many individuals saying, “‘No, they’re attempting to cease our livelihood.'”

Two years later, Walker, who isn’t concerned in operating the sanctuary however helps its boundary, says he can see the advantages. “It is simpler to catch snapper and barracuda,” he says. “At the very least my nice grandkids will get to see some fish.”

When Columbus landed in Jamaica, he sailed into Oracabessa Bay — in the present day a 20-minute drive from the mouth of the White River.

Oracabessa Bay Fish Sanctuary was the primary of the grassroots-led efforts to revive Jamaica’s coral reefs. Its sanctuary was legally integrated in 2010, and its strategy of enlisting native fishermen as patrols turned a mannequin for different areas.

“The fishermen are totally on board and comfortable — that is the excellence. That is why it is working,” sanctuary supervisor Inilek Wilmot says.

David Murray, head of the Oracabessa Fishers’ Affiliation, notes that Jamaica’s 60,000 fishermen function with out a security internet. “Fishing is like playing, it is a recreation. Generally you catch one thing, generally you do not,” he says.

When fish populations started to break down 20 years in the past, one thing needed to change.

Murray now works as a warden within the Oracabessa sanctuary, whereas persevering with to fish exterior its boundary. He additionally spends time explaining the idea to neighbors.

“It is folks work — it is a course of to get folks to agree on a sanctuary boundary,” he says. “It is a powerful job to inform a person who’s been fishing all his life that he cannot fish right here.”

However as soon as it turned clear {that a} no-fishing zone really helped close by fish populations rebound, it turned simpler to construct assist. The variety of fish within the sanctuary has doubled between 2011 and 2017, and the person fish have grown bigger — almost tripling in size on common — based on annual surveys by Jamaica’s Nationwide Atmosphere and Planning Company. And that enhances catches in surrounding areas.

After phrase received out about Oracabessa, different areas wished recommendation.

“We now have the info to point out success, however much more necessary than information is phrase of mouth,” says Wilmot, who oversaw coaching to assist begin the fish sanctuary at White River.

Belinda Morrow, a lifelong water-sports fanatic usually seen paddle-boarding along with her canine Shadow, runs the White River Marine Affiliation. She attends fishers’ conferences and raises small grants from the Jamaican authorities and different foundations to assist gear purchases and coral replanting campaigns.

“All of us depend upon the ocean,” Morrow says, sitting in a small workplace adorned with nautical maps within the iconic 70-year-old Jamaica Inn. “If we do not have an excellent wholesome reef and an excellent wholesome marine surroundings, we are going to lose an excessive amount of. An excessive amount of of the nation depends on the ocean.”

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This Related Press collection was produced in partnership with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Division of Science Schooling. The AP is solely answerable for all content material.

Heroic efforts to revive ecosystems and save species are being waged worldwide, geared toward reversing a few of humankind’s most harmful results on the planet. “What Can Be Saved?,” a weekly AP collection, chronicles the atypical folks and scientists combating for change in opposition to monumental odds _ and forging paths that others might observe.

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Follow us for more biological facts. #ecology#ecosystem#foodchain#science#scienc…

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[Biology] #everydayscience_biology 今日等我黎講下滲透(osmosis)啦 喺日常生活入面我地未必會成日都聽到滲透呢一樣野,但…

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[Biology💧]
#🤓everydayscience_biology
今日等我黎講下滲透(osmosis)啦😆
喺日常生活入面我地未必會成日都聽到滲透呢一樣野,但係其實佢喺好多地方都進行緊。滲透係水分子經過半透膜擴散嘅一個現象。水分子會由高水勢嘅區域滲入去低水勢嘅區域,直至細胞入面同細胞外面嘅濃度達到平衡為止。
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細胞會藉住滲透作用黎吸到水分又或者係喪失水分。但係有可能會因為咁而得到過多嘅水分又或者係失去太多嘅水。
或者用個例子黎講會比較易明。當我地將細胞放入濃嘅鹽水入面,由於濃嘅鹽水入面水的含量比例比細胞質低,細胞入面嘅水會不斷咁向細胞外面滲透,導致細胞脫水同萎縮。相反,將細胞放入蒸餾水入面嘅話呢,由於細胞入面嘅水含量比例比蒸餾水低,外面嘅水分子會不斷咁向細胞入面滲透,導致細胞膨脹,甚至破裂。
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而對於植物細胞呢,因為佢地嘅細胞壁同細胞膜嘅滲透性唔一樣,當細胞外嘅濃度高過入面嘅時候,細胞會出現質壁分離嘅現象,即係細胞壁同細胞膜分離。但係當佢地吸返水之後就會出現質壁分離嘅復原現象。
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#everydayscience #science #physics #chemistry #biology #plants #animals #organisms #livingthings #earth #mothernature #chloroplasts #ATP #mitochondria #foodproducer #energy #foodchain #originoflife #question #nevergiveup #AlbertEinstein #nature #world #cells #cellmembrane #osmosis

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Warsaw’s plastic palm tree ‘dies’ to mark climate threat

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A giant plastic palm tree that has become an artistic symbol of Warsaw has “died” as part of a stunt to draw attention to climate change.

Residents were surprised to see this week that the popular tree’s leaves had turned gray and were drooping, causing a buzz on social media.

“I wondered what had happened and I found on the internet that this is against air pollution and for the environment,” said Bogusia Niegocka, a 42-year-old shop assistant.

“This is a very good move, but I’m not sure it will it really make people think. Everyone wants to drive into town in the car,” she said Friday in the roundabout where the tree stands.

The artists behind the tree, Joanna Rajkowska and the Museum of Modern Art, had it installed on a downtown traffic island in 2002. This week they replaced the green leaves with lifeless-looking gray ones, to put the focus on the threat that civilization poses to the environment, and smog in Warsaw.

“I have this fear but also a sense of disillusionment that people allow themselves such silly things (that threaten the environment) in the name of short-term political interests or economic expansion,” Rajkowska told the Gazeta Wyborcza daily. “The dead palm is a sign of this.”

The move marked U.N. World Environment Day on Wednesday.

Among those praising the idea of “killing” the tree as a way of warning against the effects of climate change Friday was Ola Kania with her 4-year-old son Jas.

“I pointed out the tree to my child and said that everything will look this way if people don’t take better care of the planet,” she said.

Rajkowska said the green leaves will eventually be restored.

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[Biology] #everydayscience_biology 其實part 2只係part 1嘅Eng version聽日會再有多啲補充 Osmosis…

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[Biology💧]
#🤓everydayscience_biology
其實part 2只係part 1嘅Eng version🙈聽日會再有多啲補充😆
Osmosis refers to the net movement of water molecules from a region of higher water potential to a region of lower water potential through a differentially permeable membrane. Water potential refers to the tendency of a water molecule to move from one place to another.
Cells would gain or lose water by osmosis. However, osmosis may cause excessive water gain or water loss, which may affect the normal functioning of cells. When the cells gain too much water, the cell content is diluted. On the contrary, when the cells lose too much water, the cell content will be concentrated, and the viscosity increases.
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Take red blood cell as an example. When we put some red blood cells into concentrated saline solution, as the conc saline solution has a lower water potential, water in the cell leaves by osmosis, causing the cell to lose water and shrink. In contrast, when we put the red blood cells into distilled water, the cells will gain water by osmosis as the water potential of distilled water is higher than that of the cytoplasm. Water enters the cells by osmosis, causing them to swell, and even burst.
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For plant cells, as they have rigid cell walls, so they won’t burst. But plasmolysis occurs when they lose too much water, this causes the plant to lose turgidity. When they gain water again, they become turgid.
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#everydayscience #science #physics #chemistry #biology #plants #animals #organisms #livingthings #earth #mothernature #chloroplasts #ATP #mitochondria #foodproducer #energy #foodchain #originoflife #question #nevergiveup #AlbertEinstein #nature #world #cells #cellmembrane #osmosis

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