Tag Archives: Higher education

Students push universities to stop investing in fossil fuels

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. —
Students alarmed by climate change are stepping up pressure on universities to pull investments from fossil fuel industries, an effort that is gaining traction at prestigious schools like Georgetown, Harvard and Yale.

The push that is underway at hundreds of schools began nearly a decade ago, and student activists increasingly have learned from one another’s tactics and moved to act amid worsening predictions about the effects of climate change on the planet.

Georgetown University’s board of directors announced this month that it will end private investments in coal, oil and gas companies within the next decade, and some faculty at Harvard have called for a similar shift. There were sit-ins and demonstrations last week at dozens of schools, including Gonzaga University, the University of Wisconsin, University of Pittsburgh and Cornell University.

Several dozen schools have stopped investing at least partially in fossil fuels, but there is debate over how much the move slows the effects of climate change or affects the bottom line of companies like Chevron and Exxon Mobil.

Many schools have defended their investments, citing a duty to preserve and grow the income they receive from donations, while touting efforts to use investments as leverage to engage energy companies, find solutions for climate change through research and make campuses carbon neutral by not causing any net increases in heat-trapping carbon dioxide.

For student activists, it’s about taking a moral and political stand.

At Yale University, which has a $30.3 billion endowment, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Senate on Thursday will discuss the university’s ethical obligations regarding fossil fuel investments. It became a big issue partly due to a widely covered student protest that disrupted a November football game between Harvard and Yale.

“Yale has to take it seriously. We forced them to take it seriously. The faculty discussions are evidence of that,” said Ben Levin, a student leader with the Yale Endowment Justice Coalition. “They’re also evidence of the fact that the faculty are incredibly concerned because they don’t want to be working for a university that’s on the wrong side of the most pressing issue of our time.”

Yale says it has supported shareholder resolutions calling for companies to reveal what they’re doing to address climate change and asked endowment managers not to invest in companies that fail to take steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but student activists want a clean break.

The campus actions are part of a broader push for insurers, pension funds and governments worldwide to end fossil fuel investments.

Environmentalist and author Bill McKibben, a leader of the movement to stop such investments, said students have played a huge role.

“They’ve kept it up through two generations of undergraduates. Administrators hoped they’d graduate and that would be the end of the pressure, but instead it keeps building,” said McKibben, a scholar in residence at Middlebury College, which announced last year it would divest its $1.1 billion endowment from fossil fuels.

Student government leaders from the Big Ten Conference called last month for their 14 schools to begin divesting from fossil fuels, passing a resolution that cited the conclusion of the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that greenhouse gas emissions are driving climate change.

A challenge for institutions is the prevalence of investments in index funds, which makes it difficult to separate out the roughly 4 percent of energy stocks in such funds, said John Jurewitz, a lecturer in economics at Pomona College. Colleges pulling their investments also wouldn’t likely hurt oil companies, which have their own internal cash flows, he said.

“It’s mainly a political statement about what the university is willing to invest in,” Jurewitz said. “It may be a worthwhile statement if you believe it will help get the ball rolling toward getting some realistic, meaningful policy like a carbon tax or cap and trade, something that will put a price on the carbon in some practical way.”

The Independent Petroleum Association of America has pushed back with its own campaign, arguing divestment would cost university endowments millions a year with little impact on carbon emissions.

At Harvard, which has a $40.9 billion endowment, President Lawrence Bacow said he would take a faculty motion to the Harvard Corporation, the university’s executive board. In the past, administrators have outlined steps Harvard is taking to address climate change while arguing that ending fossil fuel investments wouldn’t have a big effect and that it makes little sense to sever ties with energy companies that heat and light the campus.

Connor Chung, a first-year student and organizer for Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard, said the group hopes the university will reconsider.

“At the end of the day, our goal is environmental justice,” he said. “Divestment is our tactic for getting there, but it’s not going to work unless we have a broader movement around the country and around the world of students demanding that their institutions end their complicity in the climate crisis.”

A group of Harvard students also want to stop investments in prisons and companies that contract with them. They sued Wednesday, arguing the school is violating state law by investing in an industry they describe as “present-day slavery.” Harvard officials didn’t immediately respond to an email seeking comment on the lawsuit.

At George Washington University, sophomore Izy Carney said a student campaign has taken inspiration from the activism of students elsewhere, including in the University of California system, which announced a plan to end fossil fuel investments in 2019.

After hearing from student activists, George Washington’s board of trustees announced a task force this month on managing environmental responsibility. But it did not mention divestment as a possibility.

Carney, a member of Sunrise GW, a student group dedicated to fighting climate change, said they would keep up the pressure.

“Right now, it sounds like profits is what our university is after,” Carney said. “We just want to make sure our school is doing everything it can to make sure it is not contributing to the climate crisis.”

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Associated Press writer Alanna Durkin Richer in Boston contributed to this report.

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3 additional Iranian students challenge removal from country

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Three more students from Iran attending New England colleges have filed civil rights complaints with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, saying they were mistreated and illegally denied entry into the country

BOSTON —
Three more students from Iran attending New England colleges have filed civil rights complaints with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, saying they were mistreated and illegally denied entry into the country.

The complaints follow similar ones filed by an Iranian student seeking to begin classes at Northeastern University and a graduate student at Harvard University.

Pegah Karimi said in her complaint filed earlier this month that she was denied entry at Boston’s Logan International Airport in August despite having a student visa to attend graduate school at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester.

Mohammad Moradi said in his separate complaint filed this month that he had a student visa to pursue a doctorate degree at Northeastern in Boston.

He said he was denied entry in October as he returned from a conference in Paris, where he presented an academic paper.

Moradi said officials denied him entry even though he’d been admitted to the U.S. three times prior that year, including after two brief trips to Canada to visit relatives.

And Behzad Rezaei said in his complaint that he had a student visa to pursue a doctorate degree at Worcester Polytechnic Institute but was denied entry in August.

Homeland Security spokespeople didn’t respond to an email seeking comment Friday.

The five students who have filed complaints to Homeland Security say they were detained for hours and subjected to harsh questioning by federal officials at the airport.

They say the officials wrongly determined they planned on staying in the country longer than their temporary student visas allowed. The students maintain they had no intention of overstaying and that federal officials provided no proof supporting their conclusions.

The five students are among at least 10 Iranians denied entry into the U.S. since August, the start of the academic year at most colleges. Seven of those had flown into Boston’s airport.

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Purdue opioid deal blasted as information present $13B to Sacklers

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Attorneys basic representing practically half the states and legal professionals for greater than 500 native governments on Friday blasted the phrases of Purdue Pharma’s provide to settle hundreds of lawsuits over the nation’s opioid disaster in courtroom filings that additionally stated the corporate had funneled as much as $13 billion to its controlling household.

Their authorized filings stated the tentative deal doesn’t include an admission of wrongdoing from members of the Sackler household, wouldn’t cease members of the family from future misconduct and would not drive them to repay cash “they pocketed from their unlawful conduct.”

The paperwork say members of the Sackler household — one of many wealthiest within the U.S. — made $12 billion to $13 billion from Purdue, the next quantity than courtroom information had beforehand given. The determine was in a sworn assertion given final month by Jesse DelConte, a restructuring marketing consultant for Purdue; an excerpt of his deposition didn’t specify over what time interval these funds have been made.

In a earlier deposition, former Purdue chief govt Richard Sackler gave solely a broad vary — between $1 billion and $10 billion — that the household created from its signature painkiller, OxyContin.

Friday’s courtroom filings object to Purdue’s request that each one lawsuits in opposition to members of the Sackler household be halted as a part of tentative settlement phrases which might be being thought of in chapter courtroom in White Plains, New York. The household faces tons of of lawsuits in state courts, together with at the least two dozen filed by state attorneys basic.

Purdue’s submitting for chapter safety final month eliminated the corporate from federal litigation in Cleveland that includes some 2,600 native governments, Native American tribes, unions and hospitals. The primary trial in that multidistrict case is scheduled to start Oct. 21.

The corporate filed for chapter after half of state attorneys basic and legal professionals representing native governments agreed to their settlement provide, which might be price as a lot as $12 billion over time.

The chapter courtroom filings this week, most of them on Friday, confirmed the extent of dissent over that supply amongst state and native governments that had been looking for a nationwide settlement.

Lots of them argue that the Purdue settlement provide doesn’t maintain the Sackler household sufficiently accountable for a disaster that has contributed to greater than 400,000 overdose deaths within the U.S. over the previous 20 years. That is why, they argued, the state circumstances in opposition to the household ought to proceed whilst Purdue’s chapter performs out.

“The Movement seems to be an try and have this Court docket prematurely approve a ‘firebreak’ technique for the advantage of the Sacklers, by which the Sacklers have determined to supply up Purdue and see if they will outrace justice for a worth they deem acceptable,” the native authorities attorneys stated of their submitting.

Below its settlement provide, Purdue could be operated as a public profit belief and its earnings could be a part of the settlement, as would the worth of overdose antidotes and a remedy drug in growth; the Sacklers would hand over management of the corporate. A part of the deal’s worth would come from a contribution of $three billion to $4.5 billion from members of the Sackler household, an quantity that at the least partially relies on how a lot they obtain from promoting their international opioid enterprise, Mundipharma.

“The provide doesn’t shut down Purdue; as an alternative it might hold Purdue in enterprise underneath a brand new identify, in order that settlement cash might be collected from future OxyContin gross sales,” the attorneys basic stated of their submitting. “If the States accepted the provide, there would by no means be a trial to find out the Sacklers’ legal responsibility for one of many biggest public well being crises of our time.”

The corporate has advised the chapter choose that if the household has to proceed to face tons of of lawsuits throughout the nation, it is likely to be “unwilling — or unable” to contribute to the settlement. The 500 governments who collectively filed on Friday stated the corporate had it “backwards.”

“The Sacklers’ failure to make an sufficient contribution itself impairs the prospect of reaching a consensual plan of group,” the submitting stated. “That failure is a motive to disclaim the injunction (in opposition to the state lawsuits), not grant it.”

Forbes has estimated that the Sacklers are one of many 20 wealthiest households within the U.S.

Daniel Connolly, a lawyer for the department of the Sackler household which might be heirs to one of many firm’s late patriarchs, Raymond Sackler, responded to the courtroom submitting that exposed the $12 billion to $13 billion determine. He stated the amount of cash taken out of Purdue by the Sacklers is just not so simple as it appears.

“The distribution numbers don’t replicate the truth that many billions of {dollars} from that quantity have been paid in taxes and reinvested in companies that shall be offered as a part of the proposed settlement,” Connolly stated in a press release Friday night.

He stated the Sacklers have agreed to surrender management of the corporate and contribute cash to deal with the opioid epidemic if all lawsuits in opposition to them are stopped. That, he stated, would “enable events to focus their efforts on this objective quite than on litigation that may waste assets and delay the deployment of options to communities in want.”

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Comply with Mulvihill at http://www.twitter.com/geoffmulvihill



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Genetic hyperlink discovered after man loses elements of arms, legs and nostril from pet germ

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It is exhausting to treat Ellie as a menace.

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When Greg Manteufel is annoyed or feeling down, she sits by him. At evening, she sleeps beneath his covers. At dinner, she’s there subsequent to him, understanding he’ll toss something her approach. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull.

“We love her like she’s our daughter,” he mentioned of the canine.

And but, Ellie will be the motive Manteufel, 49, practically died.

Gravely ailing, he misplaced elements of his legs and arms, in addition to the pores and skin of his nostril and a part of his higher lip. The trigger was capnocytophaga (cap-noh-seye-TOE’-fah-gah), a germ from Ellie’s mouth or from one other canine he encountered.

Capnocytophaga is often discovered within the saliva of cats and canine and nearly by no means results in folks getting sick, until the particular person has a compromised immune system. However Manteufel was completely wholesome. In actual fact, he does not suppose he’d ever used his medical insurance earlier than he fell ailing.

The case is extraordinarily uncommon and docs at his hospital, Froedtert & the Medical Faculty of Wisconsin, had no rationalization for why he obtained so sick. However during the last 10 years there have been a minimum of 5 different wholesome individuals who have had extreme reactions to the germ. A workforce of researchers related with Harvard Medical College has developed a principle on why — a gene change in all of the victims.

And their discovering means docs cannot rule out the capnocytophaga micro organism might strike Manteufel and different victims once more.

———

Greg Manteufel thought he was getting the flu in June of 2018. He had a fever, vomiting and diarrhea. However when he began getting confused, his household took him to the hospital.

Medical doctors did blood cultures and located capnocytophaga, which precipitated sepsis, a extreme blood an infection that led to his blood strain dropping and plenty of of his organs shutting down.

“Do what you need to, to maintain me alive,” he advised the docs.

He had a lot to dwell for — foremost, his spouse of 16 years, Daybreak, and 26-year-old son, Mike. He was simply beginning to get actually good at his day job, portray homes. He cherished his Harley Davidson Electra Glide. He was in the midst of fixing up his ’66 El Camino. And naturally there was Ellie, the pup.

And so he persevered, by greater than 20 surgical procedures, together with amputations of his left and proper arms slightly below the elbow, and legs by the center of the knee.

His spouse and son stayed optimistic, as a result of he was.

“Greg mentioned he did not come this far to put down and let this beat him,” Daybreak Manteufel mentioned.

He was out of the in-patient rehab unit in about two weeks, studying to maneuver from his wheelchair to the mattress, rest room and automobile. The same old keep is three to 4 weeks, mentioned Dr. David Del Toro, medical director for the inpatient rehab unit at Froedtert.

Manteufel made comparable fast advances utilizing his arm prosthetics and leg prosthetics.

“He doesn’t seem to be every other affected person I’ve met earlier than,” Del Toro mentioned. “He is simply, you understand, full pace forward.”

In the meantime, researchers at Brigham and Girls’s Hospital in Boston, related to Harvard Medical College, in addition to Dana-Farber Most cancers Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Middle had been investigating instances like his.

The workforce has finished genetic testing on 5 in any other case wholesome individuals who suffered capnocytophaga infections to see if they might discover something in frequent. They found all had a gene related to the immune system that was working otherwise — a genetic variant.

“It was a extremely thrilling second,” mentioned Elizabeth Fieg, a genetic counselor at Brigham and Girls’s Hospital. “The stakes are so excessive with these instances and the sufferers have gone by a lot.”

They imagine it makes these folks extra vulnerable to growing extreme medical issues from capnocytophaga. However they’re additionally attempting to find out if there are different danger elements.

Of the 5 within the examine, three survived with amputations and two didn’t. Fieg hopes their analysis can decide why some didn’t survive.

She additionally hopes if their principle is confirmed, it can assist diagnose instances sooner, and maybe save lives and limbs.

That is why Greg Manteufel jumped on the probability to participate when he was approached in August.

Researchers want to collect extra proof, however hope to publish their examine within the subsequent yr to 18 months.

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Manteufel’s life now contains frequent occupational remedy appointments to excellent his use of arm prosthetics — the type with steel moveable hooks on the finish. He is utilizing a fork frequently and he is now engaged on choosing up the TV distant, opening doorknobs, slicing greens and doing the dishes.

He is utilizing shortened leg prosthetics, known as stubbies, to get his physique conditioned to finally use to full-sized ones. These are anticipated to reach any day.

Plastic surgeons plan one other surgical procedure to excellent his nostril. They’ve already moved pores and skin from his brow there. It appears to be like outsized now, however it can finally slot in with the remainder of his face.

He plans to get his automobile revamped so he can drive with prosthetics. He desires to get a particular pole so he can go fishing once more. He’s even contemplating going again to work portray.

He is additionally grow to be much less quiet and much more outgoing. “Now everyone I see desires to listen to one thing or speak to me. I inform them a 15-minute story about what occurred. They in all probability need me to go away, you understand,” he mentioned, chuckling.

Ellie’s typically by his facet.

“She loves youngsters. She loves puppies. Different canine,” Manteufel mentioned.

As innocent as she appears, she might have capnocytophaga germ.

The outcomes of Manteufel’s genetic exams are anticipated in three to 4 months. Fieg mentioned folks with the gene variant are at elevated danger for recurrent capnocytophaga or different infections sooner or later.

Whereas Manteufel does not just like the sound of that, he mentioned Ellie’s by chance scratched him since he is been dwelling and even licked his mouth. He is been fantastic.

And even when he does have the gene variant, he mentioned, it modifications nothing.

“We did not even hassle testing her,” mentioned Manteufel. “We weren’t going to eliminate her if it was her that precipitated it anyway.”

“We simply love her to demise.”

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This model of the story corrects to say Harley Davidson Electra Glide bike as a substitute of Electrical Glide.

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Some states say they will maintain preventing Purdue Pharma in courtroom

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Courtroom showdowns nonetheless face OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and the household that owns it, the Sacklers.

However after a tentative settlement reached Wednesday with 1000’s of native governments and greater than 20 states, the struggle might be much less in regards to the harm carried out by the corporate and extra over the best way to divide its belongings.

The settlement may very well be price as much as $12 billion over time. That quantity contains future earnings for the corporate, the worth of overdose antidotes it is creating and money funds of $three billion to $4.5 billion from the Sacklers, the rich household that owns Purdue Pharma. The quantity is contingent on the sale of the household’s worldwide drug firm, Mundipharma, which, like Purdue, has been criticized for overselling the advantages of its highly effective prescription opioid painkillers and understating the dangers.

The tentative settlement and anticipated chapter submitting would nearly actually take away Purdue from the primary federal trial over the opioids epidemic, scheduled to start subsequent month in Cleveland. There, a jury is to contemplate claims from two Ohio counties towards a gaggle of drugmakers, distributors and one pharmacy chain, Walgreens. A shedding verdict for Purdue may irreparably harm the privately held firm.

Critics are fuming that the deal will not be price near the acknowledged $12 billion, that it will not pressure inner firm paperwork to be made public and that it does not do sufficient to carry the corporate or its house owners accountable. “The concept that Purdue may get away with out having to confess any wrongdoing flies within the face of each definition of justice and accountability identified to the human race. It is unconscionable,” mentioned Ryan Hampton, a Los Angeles-based advocate for folks in restoration from opioid habit.

For the Stamford, Connecticut-based firm, one of many subsequent steps is a chapter submitting, which might doubtless finish lawsuits filed towards the corporate by some 2,000 counties, municipalities, Native American tribes, unions and hospitals, together with practically each state.

Parities that do not signal on to the settlement may elevate objections in chapter courtroom — and a few states have made it clear that that is their plan.

“Far too many lives have been misplaced or devastated in Rhode Island because of the opioid disaster,” Rhode Island Legal professional Common Peter Neronha mentioned in a press release Wednesday.

He added, “We’re dedicated to persevering with to aggressively pursue our claims towards Purdue Pharma and the Sacklers.”

The state was already suing some members of the Sackler household , which was listed by Forbes journal in 2016 as one of many 20 richest within the nation. On Wednesday, it added extra members of the family to the go well with. Greater than 20 different states even have authorized claims towards members of the family, and lots of plan to maintain pursuing them. Pennsylvania filed a declare Thursday towards members of the family as people, one thing the lawyer normal there mentioned final week he deliberate to do.

On the opposite aspect, a number of attorneys normal mentioned the settlement was a greater method to make sure compensation from Purdue and the Sacklers than taking their probabilities if Purdue recordsdata for chapter by itself.

Arizona Legal professional Common Mark Brnovich mentioned the deal “was the quickest and surest solution to get quick aid for Arizona and for the communities which were harmed by the opioid disaster and the actions of the Sackler household.”

However even advocates of the deal cautioned that it is not but full.

“There’s nonetheless quite a lot of phone calls happening. I feel we see the outlines of a factor that is perhaps, nevertheless it’s not but,” Ohio Legal professional Common Dave Yost mentioned in an interview.

Opioid habit has contributed to the deaths of some 400,000 Individuals over the previous twenty years, hitting many rural communities notably onerous.

In a press release after Wednesday’s announcement, the corporate mentioned that it “continues to work with all plaintiffs on reaching a complete decision to its opioid litigation that can ship billions of {dollars} and important opioid overdose rescue medicines to communities throughout the nation impacted by the opioid disaster.”

Members of the Sackler household mentioned in a press release there are good causes for governments to hitch the settlement: “That is the simplest solution to handle the urgency of the present public well being disaster, and to fund actual options, not infinite litigation.”

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Mulvihill reported from New Jersey. Related Press writers Jonathan J. Cooper in Phoenix; Carla Okay. Johnson in Seattle; Jennifer McDermott in Windfall, Rhode Island; and Julie Carr Smyth in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.

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This story has been corrected to indicate Purdue Pharma relies in Connecticut, not Ohio.

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To spice up workforce, medical faculties attempt to promote rural life

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On a discipline journey to the Birthplace of Nation Music Museum, Ashish Bibireddy placed on headphones and scrolled by means of a jukebox of music from an influential 1927 recording session.

Bibireddy and 9 different medical college students had already been biking and rafting on their go to to rural Appalachia organized by a close-by medical school. But it surely wasn’t simply informal sightseeing; the tour was a part of a concerted effort to draw a brand new technology of docs to rural areas scuffling with well being care shortages.

The Quillen Faculty of Medication at East Tennessee State College is amongst a small group of medical faculties throughout the U.S. with packages devoted to bolstering the variety of main care docs in rural communities.

The faculties ship college students to reside in small cities and practice with rural docs. Like Quillen, some additionally set up outings and cultural experiences to attempt to promote college students on residing there after they graduate.

Colleges have taken college students to a ranch to model cattle, introduced in an Appalachian story teller and catered native delicacies to point out college students who might have by no means lived with out the comfort of a Starbucks or Goal what rural life provides.

“It is a little bit sense of what the enjoyable a part of rural life will be,” stated Dr. Dana King, chair of the household medication division at West Virginia College Faculty of Medication, the place college students within the rural monitor go to a ski resort, go to a coal mine and go whitewater rafting.

On the College of Colorado Faculty of Medication, college students can meet with the mayor, police chief or different leaders of rural communities and interview residents to be taught in regards to the city.

“We need to give the scholars an thought about what goes into the workings of a small group,” stated Dr. Mark Deutchman, director of the college’s rural monitor.

A lot of the greater than 7,000 amenities, inhabitants teams and areas within the U.S. going through a scarcity of main care physicians — usually a affected person’s first level of contact for remedy — are rural, based on the U.S. Division of Well being and Human Companies. They want practically 4,000 extra physicians to shut the hole.

A lot of the college students who got here to Quillen didn’t develop up or attend college in rural areas, however all expressed an curiosity in working with underserved populations, rural packages coordinator Carolyn Sliger stated.

The scholars spent three weeks with docs in rural cities in japanese Tennessee and every week in June exploring the area. After the museum tour, they visited a warfare memorial with an everlasting flame and hulking U.S. army assault helicopter. The group then headed to a rooftop bar overlooking Bristol, the place the brick-lined most important road straddles the Virginia-Tennessee state line.

Bibireddy, 23, grew up in suburban Edison, New Jersey, and attended the College of Central Florida medical school in Orlando. He by no means lived in a rural space however was impressed with what he noticed of Appalachian life through the go to.

“The folks listed here are genuinely caring,” he stated.

He was inclined to work in a rural space after medical college however acknowledged that constructing relationships with a group as an outsider can be troublesome.

Jason Soong, one other medical scholar in this system, stated he has “all the time identified” that he wished to reside in a sparsely populated place with open house. Soong, 23, grew up in a Philadelphia suburb and attended California Northstate College Faculty of Medication exterior Sacramento.

“Dwelling out in a rural space, you may simply go exterior your door, and you’ve got nature proper there,” Soong stated.

Katherine Schaffer and some different college students ended their day in Bristol round a patio desk at a classy downtown bakery.

Schaffer, 27, stated she was excited to satisfy individuals who shared her curiosity in rural observe. Her medical college associates in Norfolk, Virginia need to work in cities as specialists and fear they would not have a social life in a small city, she stated.

“I believe it’s totally troublesome in my medical college to search out like-minded folks,” she instructed the group.

Directors of rural monitor medical college packages say their graduates go into rural observe at significantly greater charges than different docs. However a lot of these college students are already inclined to observe in a rural space, so the figures might exaggerate the packages’ success, stated Dr. Randall Longenecker, affiliate challenge director for the Collaborative for Rural Main care, Analysis, Training and Follow.

“We skim the cream off the highest,” stated Longenecker, whose analysis has documented 39 accredited faculties of drugs and faculties of osteopathic medication which have clearly delineated rural coaching tracks — a couple of fifth of U.S. medical faculties.

For college students from small cities, the packages will help preserve their enthusiasm for rural life, stated Dr. Joseph Florence, director of rural packages at Quillen.

Florence stated large metropolis medical packages push college students to turn out to be specialists and keep away from main care.

“They beat rural out of you by the point you permit,” he stated. The agricultural monitor packages, then again, give the scholars “a spot to be rural and never solely be accepted however be appreciated for it,” he stated.

Dr. Darrin Nichols, 28, stated the agricultural monitor program at West Virginia College Faculty of Medication confirmed his option to observe close to the West Virginia city of roughly 800 folks the place he grew up. He was struck by the camaraderie of coal miners he met throughout a visit organized by the college and stated it reminded him of his personal tight household bonds.

“I all the time wished to remain close to my household and observe in a group that had these varieties of relationships,” he stated.

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Congo pupil with Ebola nonetheless finds a approach to take exams

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Claude Mabowa Sasi had misplaced his mom, a brother and a sister to Ebola. As a substitute of fearing dying when he, too, was recognized with the illness, the younger man had a unique fear: How would he full his faculty entrance exams?

It had been his mom’s best hope that Mabowa would go to school. To take action would require passing the secondary faculty baccalaureate, or “bac.”

However the exams are held solely every year in Congo, and the 21-year-old Mabowa was being held in medical isolation, unable to sit down in the identical room with different test-takers.

So the medical employees members caring for him at an Ebola therapy middle run by the Alliance for Worldwide Medical Motion, or ALIMA, got here up with an answer.

They discovered a college official prepared to proctor the examination as Mabowa took it safely behind a window. The papers have been handed to Mabowa with out touching him. After ending, he held his pages up one after the other to the window so that they could possibly be photographed with a smartphone after which emailed to officers for scoring. Then his work and his pencil have been incinerated. For the oral a part of the examination, the questions have been requested of him by the glass.

On Saturday, Mabowa accomplished the final of his exams. He’s awaiting the outcomes whereas nonetheless in isolation, the place he’ll keep till the virus is gone from his physique. He hopes to review political science on the College of Kisangani.

“My mom had informed me: ‘My son, you need to examine. When you’ve got your diploma, you’ll achieve life. Even when your mother and father are gone, you continue to have your life to dwell,'” he mentioned.

The Ebola outbreak in japanese Congo has killed greater than 1,700 folks because it began almost a 12 months in the past. Well being employees are racing to comprise the outbreak, making an attempt to hint, vaccinate and isolate all individuals who have come into contact with these carrying the extremely contagious virus.

The one folks allowed in Mabowa’s presence are survivors, who’re proof against the virus, and well being employees sporting protecting gear from head to toe.

Mabowa already had misplaced his older sister when he developed a splitting headache and fever and misplaced his urge for food. However since he had just lately been vaccinated in opposition to Ebola, he dismissed his signs as unwanted side effects of the shot. He lastly went to the Ebola middle in Beni when his sickness made him unable to proceed learning.

After testing constructive for Ebola, he started asking the nurses and medical doctors about how he may nonetheless take his exams. Learning was tough as a result of Mabowa not had entry to his notebooks and different supplies.

The ALIMA employees members who have been moved by his want to take his exams even introduced Mabowa a college uniform he may put on whereas taking the bac — a white costume shirt and navy trousers.

“The very fact we introduced the exams to him is a vital step for his therapeutic and restoration,” mentioned Goretti Muhumira, a psychologist with ALIMA.

The toughest half, Mabowa mentioned, was the oral exams, and never simply because he was nervous.

“It was tough for me to listen to them nicely by the glass, so that they needed to repeat themselves a number of instances earlier than I may perceive the query,” he mentioned.

Now he waits.

“I’ve not misplaced the whole lot, and I’m assured that I’ll succeed and honor my mom’s reminiscence,” he mentioned. “If she have been nonetheless right here, I feel she’d be pleased with me.”

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Related Press author Al-Hadji Kudra Maliro contributed to this report.

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All-girls school becomes 1st in US with varsity esports

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As a liaison at the U.S. Department of Education, J Collins watched as colleges by the dozen rolled out varsity esports programs, complete with scholarships, coaches and even some arenas. Collins had a gnawing concern: Gaming was beginning to have an impact on education, and at least anecdotally, the benefits were going largely toward male students.

Now, Collins is on the ground attempting to solve a puzzle that’s perplexed an industry approaching $1 billion revenues — where are all the female gamers?

Collins helped a private school near Cleveland become the first U.S. all-girls school to launch a varsity esports program during last school year. With Collins as coach, the 10-person team at Hathaway Brown competed against local schools and libraries, with players ranging from novices to avid gamers. The players reported many of the benefits associated with traditional sports — bonding, teamwork and improved confidence among them — and some say they might pursue college scholarships. Collins hopes the program can set an example for how high schools can attract more girl and gender minority gamers so they can take advantage of expanding opportunities at the university level.

Collins has a background in game-based education and was the first to broach the topic of esports at the Department of Education late in President Barack Obama’s final term. Football became a go-to analogy — the sport has impacted high school and college education in major ways, with resources poured into aiding its almost exclusively male participants.

Esports has already begun to spread in similar fashion. Over 100 colleges have varsity esports programs, and more are joining each year, with many smaller schools using teams as recruiting tools. That expansion could open doors for students of all genders, especially since video games don’t have the same physical barriers as most traditional sports.

“There was an imperative for us to be involved with it from an early outset, so that we could ensure there was equity across implementations,” Collins said.

Collins found that collegiate esports teams were struggling to find non-male players. The same complaint kept coming up: Girls and women aren’t in esports because they don’t play video games.

That didn’t jive with the data, which shows that 45% of gamers in the U.S. are female .

“It got us thinking, maybe the problem isn’t that there aren’t girl gamers and gender minority gamers,” Collins said. “Maybe the problem is that they’re in different places than the esports teams are looking.”

Collins suspects the trajectory for girls in gaming is similar to girls and gender minorities in STEM. Research shows many girls shy away from science, technology, engineering and math tracks around middle school due to “lack of role models, toxic culture and generally feeling like they don’t fit in in that world,” Collins said.

League of Legends, the world’s most popular esport, fits a similar description. There are no women in its highest professional circuit, and its largely male player base has been criticized for its toxic reputation. After leaving the Department of Education to teach at Hathaway Brown last fall, Collins polled students, who reported enthusiastically playing games like Super Smash Bros., a fighting game from Nintendo, and Just Dance, a motion-based dance game. Hardly any were interested in League of Legends.

“That got me thinking that maybe it wasn’t just the structure of some of these things,” Collins said. “Maybe it was the game selection.”

Collins helped organize a league comprised of 10 schools and libraries from varying backgrounds, including rural, urban, underserved and all-girls. In order to attract a wider selection of students, a panel selected three games for the first year of the league. It settled on a sports game (Rocket League), a digital card game (Hearthstone), and a multiplayer online battle arena game (Heroes of the Storm) — not the games requested by female students, necessarily, but none with reputations similar to League of Legends, either.

Ninth grader Claire Hofstra was among the most enthusiastic respondents, and Collins asked her to find four other freshmen to fill out a Heroes of the Storm squad. Even though the game is similar in playstyle to League of Legends — the kind of thing girls supposedly don’t like — the ninth graders enjoyed it so much they continued to get together and play, even when the season ended.

The benefits for the girls were plenty. Julianna Reineks was in her first year at HB and lives an hour away from the school, and the esports team helped her make friends. Kaila Morris, another freshman who described herself as “pretty shy,” found her voice as a broadcaster during the league’s championship matches. And Hofstra — an avid gamer before joining the HB team — overcame the peer pressure she felt at her previous public school to give up gaming.

“This helped me stick with it,” she said. “I definitely felt the pressure, just because I’m a girl, people don’t really take you seriously.”

All three students who spoke to The Associated Press plan to return to the esports team next season, and they’re hoping the league will adopt games even better targeted to them and their friends — Super Smash Bros and Splatoon are the big ones. They’re still a few years off from making college decisions, but all three also said they’d consider playing collegiate esports, especially if a scholarship is involved.

It’s a small but encouraging step to Collins, who is transgender and has felt alternately better connected and more isolated from people in their own life because of video games. Perhaps the most heartwarming takeaway from the first-year esports league for Collins was that the loudest complaint from students was they didn’t get enough interaction with kids from other schools.

“I was stunned,” Collins said. “That’s pretty incredible.

“Games can bring people together. They can just sit down and start playing together. That’s a beautiful thing. We need to make sure that the systems that we have in place encourage that instead of discourage that.”

———

Follow Jake Seiner on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jake—Seiner

———

More AP Esports: https://apnews.com/Esports and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports



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All-girls school becomes 1st in US with varsity esports

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As a liaison at the U.S. Department of Education, J Collins watched as colleges by the dozen rolled out varsity esports programs, complete with scholarships, coaches and even some arenas. Collins had a gnawing concern: Gaming was beginning to have an impact on education, and at least anecdotally, the benefits were going largely toward male students.

Now, Collins is on the ground attempting to solve a puzzle that’s perplexed an industry approaching $1 billion revenues — where are all the female gamers?

Collins helped a private school near Cleveland become the first U.S. all-girls school to launch a varsity esports program during last school year. With Collins as coach, the 10-person team at Hathaway Brown competed against local schools and libraries, with players ranging from novices to avid gamers. The players reported many of the benefits associated with traditional sports — bonding, teamwork and improved confidence among them — and some say they might pursue college scholarships. Collins hopes the program can set an example for how high schools can attract more girl and gender minority gamers so they can take advantage of expanding opportunities at the university level.

Collins has a background in game-based education and was the first to broach the topic of esports at the Department of Education late in President Barack Obama’s final term. Football became a go-to analogy — the sport has impacted high school and college education in major ways, with resources poured into aiding its almost exclusively male participants.

Esports has already begun to spread in similar fashion. Over 100 colleges have varsity esports programs, and more are joining each year, with many smaller schools using teams as recruiting tools. That expansion could open doors for students of all genders, especially since video games don’t have the same physical barriers as most traditional sports.

“There was an imperative for us to be involved with it from an early outset, so that we could ensure there was equity across implementations,” Collins said.

Collins found that collegiate esports teams were struggling to find non-male players. The same complaint kept coming up: Girls and women aren’t in esports because they don’t play video games.

That didn’t jive with the data, which shows that 45% of gamers in the U.S. are female .

“It got us thinking, maybe the problem isn’t that there aren’t girl gamers and gender minority gamers,” Collins said. “Maybe the problem is that they’re in different places than the esports teams are looking.”

Collins suspects the trajectory for girls in gaming is similar to girls and gender minorities in STEM. Research shows many girls shy away from science, technology, engineering and math tracks around middle school due to “lack of role models, toxic culture and generally feeling like they don’t fit in in that world,” Collins said.

League of Legends, the world’s most popular esport, fits a similar description. There are no women in its highest professional circuit, and its largely male player base has been criticized for its toxic reputation. After leaving the Department of Education to teach at Hathaway Brown last fall, Collins polled students, who reported enthusiastically playing games like Super Smash Bros., a fighting game from Nintendo, and Just Dance, a motion-based dance game. Hardly any were interested in League of Legends.

“That got me thinking that maybe it wasn’t just the structure of some of these things,” Collins said. “Maybe it was the game selection.”

Collins helped organize a league comprised of 10 schools and libraries from varying backgrounds, including rural, urban, underserved and all-girls. In order to attract a wider selection of students, a panel selected three games for the first year of the league. It settled on a sports game (Rocket League), a digital card game (Hearthstone), and a multiplayer online battle arena game (Heroes of the Storm) — not the games requested by female students, necessarily, but none with reputations similar to League of Legends, either.

Ninth grader Claire Hofstra was among the most enthusiastic respondents, and Collins asked her to find four other freshmen to fill out a Heroes of the Storm squad. Even though the game is similar in playstyle to League of Legends — the kind of thing girls supposedly don’t like — the ninth graders enjoyed it so much they continued to get together and play, even when the season ended.

The benefits for the girls were plenty. Julianna Reineks was in her first year at HB and lives an hour away from the school, and the esports team helped her make friends. Kaila Morris, another freshman who described herself as “pretty shy,” found her voice as a broadcaster during the league’s championship matches. And Hofstra — an avid gamer before joining the HB team — overcame the peer pressure she felt at her previous public school to give up gaming.

“This helped me stick with it,” she said. “I definitely felt the pressure, just because I’m a girl, people don’t really take you seriously.”

All three students who spoke to The Associated Press plan to return to the esports team next season, and they’re hoping the league will adopt games even better targeted to them and their friends — Super Smash Bros and Splatoon are the big ones. They’re still a few years off from making college decisions, but all three also said they’d consider playing collegiate esports, especially if a scholarship is involved.

It’s a small but encouraging step to Collins, who is transgender and has felt alternately better connected and more isolated from people in their own life because of video games. Perhaps the most heartwarming takeaway from the first-year esports league for Collins was that the loudest complaint from students was they didn’t get enough interaction with kids from other schools.

“I was stunned,” Collins said. “That’s pretty incredible.

“Games can bring people together. They can just sit down and start playing together. That’s a beautiful thing. We need to make sure that the systems that we have in place encourage that instead of discourage that.”

———

Follow Jake Seiner on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jake—Seiner

———

More AP Esports: https://apnews.com/Esports and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports



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Quarantines at 2 LA universities amid US measles outbreak

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A quarantine order was issued Thursday for hundreds of students and staff at two Los Angeles universities who may have been exposed to measles and either have not been vaccinated or can’t verify that they have immunity.

Measles in the United States has climbed to its highest level in 25 years, closing in on 700 cases this year in a resurgence largely attributed to misinformation that is turning parents against vaccines. Roughly three-quarters of this year’s illnesses have been in New York state.

The University of California, Los Angeles, said that as of Wednesday there were 119 students and 8 faculty members under quarantine. Seventy-one students and 127 staff members are quarantined at California State University, Los Angeles after a possible measles exposure at a campus library, school officials said.

“The Department of Public Health has determined that there is no known current risk related to measles at the library at this time,” Cal State said in a statement.

UCLA said some people could remain in quarantines for up to 48 hours before they prove immunity. A few may need to remain in quarantine for up to seven days, officials said.

Such an order mandates that the exposed people stay home and notify authorities “if they develop symptoms of measles, and to avoid contact with others until the end of their quarantine period or until they provide evidence of immunity,” the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health said in a statement.

The orders come as a small outbreak of measles is occurring in Los Angeles County involving five confirmed cases linked to overseas travel. The state recorded 38 measles cases as of Thursday; there were 11 around the same time last year, said Dr. Karen Smith, director of the California Department of Public Health.

The state typically sees fewer than two dozen cases a year, she said.

This year, California’s cases stretch across 11 counties and affect patients from 5 months old to 55.

More than 76% of patients were not vaccinated or didn’t receive the recommended two doses of vaccine, Smith said. Fourteen of those infected had traveled overseas to countries including Philippines, Thailand, India and Ukraine.

Measles in most people causes fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. However, a very small fraction of those infected can suffer complications such as pneumonia and a dangerous swelling of the brain.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the vaccine for everyone over a year old, except for people who had the disease as children. Those who have had measles are immune.

The vaccine, which became available in the 1960s, is considered safe and highly effective, and because of it, measles was declared all but eliminated in the U.S. in 2000.

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