Tag Archives: ELEC

Samsung Electronics confirms coronavirus case at phone

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SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics (005930.KS) said on Saturday that one coronavirus case had been confirmed at its mobile device factory complex in the southeastern city of Gumi, causing a shutdown of its entire facility there until Monday morning.

Samsung Electronics, the world’s top smartphone maker, said the floor where the infected employee worked would be shut down until the morning of Feb. 25.

“The company has placed colleagues who came in contact with the infected employee in self-quarantine and taken steps to have them tested for possible infection,” Samsung said in a news release.

Samsung’s factory in Gumi accounts for a small portion of its total smartphone production, and it makes high-end phones, mostly for the domestic market. Samsung produces most of its smartphones in Vietnam and India.

Gumi is close to the city of Daegu, home to a church at the center of South Korea’s largest coronavirus outbreak.

South Korea said on Saturday that the number of people infected with the coronavirus in the country had more than doubled to 433.

Samsung said production at its chip and display factories in other parts of South Korea would not be affected.

Reporting by Hyunjoo Jin. Editing by Gerry Doyle

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Samsung Electronics to launch Galaxy Fold in Sept after display screen issues

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FILE PHOTO: The Samsung Galaxy Fold cellphone is proven on a display screen at Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s Unpacked occasion in San Francisco, California, U.S., February 20, 2019 REUTERS/Stephen Nellis

SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s (005930.KS) first foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Fold, will go on sale from September in chosen markets after the launch was delayed by display screen issues earlier this 12 months, the corporate mentioned on Thursday.

Samsung is hoping its extremely anticipated foldable cellphone will revive flagging smartphone gross sales however its rollout has been hampered by defects in samples reported in April.

The South Korean tech big mentioned in a press release it had made enhancements to the practically $2,000 cellphone and was conducting closing assessments. Modifications included strengthening hinges which early reviewers had discovered to be problematic.

The world’s prime smartphone maker has hailed the folding design as the long run in a phase that has seen few surprises since Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) groundbreaking iPhone was launched in 2007.

Chinese language rival Huawei Applied sciences Co Ltd has additionally introduced a folding handset, the Mate X, which is predicted to go on sale in September.

Samsung remains to be in talks with cell carriers world wide to determine on particulars of the Fold’s sale, a supply with information of the matter mentioned.

Reporting by Ju-min Park and Heekyong Yang; Modifying by Stephen Coates

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Samsung in hot water over splashy Australian phone ads

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SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s consumer watchdog has sued Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s (005930.KS) Australian unit for allegedly misleading consumers by promoting water-resistant Galaxy smartphones as suitable to use in swimming pools and the surf.

FILE PHOTO: A model demonstrates the waterproof function of Samsung Electronics’ new smartphone, Galaxy S7 Edge, during its launch ceremony in Seoul, South Korea, March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji/File Photo

The world’s largest smartphone maker did not know or sufficiently test the effects of pool or saltwater exposure on its phones when ads showed them fully submerged, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) lawsuit says.

The case is the first filed by a major regulator and could result in multi-million dollar fines. It centers on more than 300 advertisements in which Samsung showed its Galaxy phones being used at the bottom of swimming pools and in the ocean.

“The ACCC alleges Samsung’s advertisements falsely and misleadingly represented Galaxy phones would be suitable for use in, or for exposure to, all types of water … when this was not the case,” ACCC Chairman Rod Sims said in a statement on Thursday.

Samsung said it stood by its advertising, complied with Australian law and would defend the case.

The South Korean electronics giant has spent heavily on advertising to rebuild public faith in its premium smartphones following the costly recall of its fire-prone Galaxy Note 7 devices in 2016.

It is due to announce preliminary quarterly earnings on Friday, when it is widely expected to flag a profit plunge due to falls in chip prices.

HOT WATER

Samsung’s water resistance claims came under heavy scrutiny as early as 2016 when influential U.S. magazine Consumer Reports said the Galaxy S7 phone – which appears dunked in a fish tank in commercials – had failed an immersion test.

The company attributed that to a manufacturing defect, affecting a small number of phones, which it soon fixed. But customers online continued reporting problems, forum comments show.

Some consumers damaged their phones when exposing them to water and Samsung had refused to honor warranty claims, the ACCC said in the lawsuit, though Samsung said it complied with all of its warranty obligations under Australian law.

The regulator also said Samsung’s advice to some Galaxy model users that the phones were not suitable for beach or pool use suggested the firm considered water could cause damage.

“Samsung showed the Galaxy phones used in situations they shouldn’t be to attract customers,” Sims said.

“Samsung’s advertisements, we believe, denied consumers an informed choice and gave Samsung an unfair competitive advantage.”

The ACCC alleges law breaches occurred in more than 300 advertisements. If proven, each breach after 1 Sept. 2018 can attract a fine of up to A$10 million ($7 million), triple the benefit of the conduct or as much as 10% of annual turnover.

Breaches prior to 1 Sept. 2018 can attract penalties as high as A$1.1 million. Rival Sony settled a U.S. class action over similar claims for its Xperia smartphone range in 2017, promising refunds where the phones had failed.

Reporting by Tom Westbrook in SYDNEY. Additional reporting by Ju-min Park in SEOUL; Editing by Christopher Cushing and Stephen Coates

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